Common Literary terms.docx - Allegory a narrative or...

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Allegory: a narrative or description having a 2 nd meaning beneath the surface one. A story, fictional or non-fictional, in which characters, things & events represent qualities or concepts. The interactions of these characters, things, or events is meant to reveal an abstraction or truth. These characteristics may be symbols of the ideas referred to Alliteration: the repetition at close intervals of initial identical consonant sounds, or vowels in successive words or syllables usually that repeat Allusion: an indirect reference to something (usually a literary text) with which the reader is expected to be familiar. Usually literary, historical, biblical, or mythological. Analogy: a comparison to a directly parallel case. When an author uses an analogy, he/she argues a claim reasonable for one case is reasonable for the corresponding case Anecdote: a brief recounting of a relevant episode. Often inserted into the fictional/non-fictional texts as a way of developing a point or injecting humor Apostrophe: an address to the dead as if living; to the inanimate as if animate; to the absent as if present; to the unborn as if alive. EX. “O Julius Caesar though are mighty; yet thy spirit walks abroad” or “Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean, roll.” Aside: dramatic convention by which an actor directly addresses the audience but it is not to be heard by the other actors on stage. It does not break the 4 th wall Assonance: repetition of a vowel sound within 2 or more words in close proximity. “Fake” and “lake” denote rhymes; “fate” and “lake” assonance Asyndeton: a series of words separated by commas (with no conjunction). “I came, I saw, I conquered.” The parts of the sentence are emphasized equally. In addition, the use of commas with no intervening
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