report - ASE 324L Laboratory #2 Aluminum Alloys and Heat...

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ASE 324L Laboratory #2 Aluminum Alloys and Heat Treatments Amber Mueller February 14, 2008 1
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Abstract Specimens of T351 Aluminum alloy were treated in several different ways. One specimen was unchanged from the original T351 treatment. One specimen was annealed at 550 degrees Celsius. The remaining four were aged at 190 degrees Celsius for 0.5, 2.0, 6.0, and 24 hours. A tensile test was performed on each specimen and stress-strain curves were created for each specimen. The Young’s modulus (E), Poisson’s ratio (v), 0.2% offset yield stress( σ 0.2), ultimate tensile stress( σ uts), toughness(T) and ductility for length change(Dl) and area change(Da) were found for each treatment type and compared to find the best material to use for structural components in aircraft. For 2 hour aged aluminum, E=10097 ksi, v=0.5, σ 0.2=60.06 ksi, σ uts=73.92 ksi, T=3.97 ksi, Dl=0.17, and Da=0.33. For 6 hour aged aluminum, E=9823 ksi, v=0.5, σ 0.2=68.91 ksi, σ uts=73.82 ksi, T=8.30 ksi, Dl=0.09, and Da=0.28. For 24 hour aged aluminum, E=10002 ksi, v=1.2, σ 0.2=66.17 ksi, σ uts=73.20 ksi, T=8.30 ksi, Dl=009, and Da=0.27. For 0.5 hour aged aluminum, E=9667 ksi, v=0.5, σ 0.2=47.27 ksi, σ uts=67.55 ksi, T=16.42 ksi, Dl=0.24, and Da=0.32. For T351 aluminum, E=10295 ksi, v=0.6, σ 0.2=52.87 ksi, σ uts=69.4 ksi, T=8.23 ksi, Dl=0.19, and Da=0.30. For annealed aluminum, E=5702 ksi, v=0.5, σ 0.2=52.87 ksi, σ uts=36.60 ksi, T=9.72 ksi, Dl=0.21, and Da=0.38. The 0.5 hour and 6 hour aged specimens are the best to use for structural components in aircraft, with the 0.5 hour aged being best for toughness, and 6 hour aged being best for strength. 2
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Introduction A tensile test is used to find several characteristics of a specimen, including strength and toughness. It is important to know how a tensile test is done and how to interpret the data returned by the test so that the uses of the tested material can be determined. Using the data provided, one can create stress-strain curves to see how the material behaves. These results help to compare the characteristics of different materials or different manufacturing processes of the same material. A variety of treatments can be applied to metals to vary their material properties. Solution treatment involves heating the metal to a high temperature and then quenching it. Quenching is the process of rapidly cooling to retain the single α phase. It is supersaturated and in a non equilibrium state. It can help to harden the alloy. Annealing involves heating the metal to a high temperature and then cooling it slowly. There is formation of a θ phase and the ratio of α to θ phase and it is in a non equilibrium state. This removes all effects of the T351 solution treatment. Aging involves heating the metal to a moderate temperature and holding it at the temperature for a set amount of time and then slow cooling it. This combines with the T351 treatment to harden the metal and increase yield strength. To compare these hardening methods, similar specimens of each type are tested
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report - ASE 324L Laboratory #2 Aluminum Alloys and Heat...

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