Ebony.pdf - Chris Biffar The Quest For Civil Rights EBONY I...

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Unformatted text preview: Chris​ ​Biffar The​ ​Quest​ ​For​ ​Civil​ ​Rights 9/29/17 EBONY “I​ ​am​ ​an​ ​American​ ​citizen​ ​and​ ​feel​ ​I​ ​am​ ​entitled​ ​to​ ​the​ ​same​ ​rights​ ​as​ ​any​ ​other​ ​citizen.” Nat​ ​King​ ​Cole​ ​stood​ ​by​ ​this​ ​belief​ ​as​ ​early​ ​as​ ​1937,​ ​so​ ​seeing​ ​him​ ​on​ ​the​ ​1960​ ​April​ ​edition​ ​of Ebony​,​ ​which​ ​was​ ​a​ ​magazine​ ​primarily​ ​targeted​ ​for​ ​black​ ​American​ ​readers,​​ ​shows​ ​how prominent​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​of​ ​equality​ ​had​ ​become.​ ​With​ ​this​ ​idea​ ​being​ ​embodied​ ​on​ ​the​ ​cover,​ ​it​ ​shows how​ ​unified​ ​the​ ​push​ ​for​ ​progress​ ​was​ ​becoming.​ ​However​ ​strong​ ​this​ ​cover​ ​may​ ​be,​ ​there​ ​is​ ​also a​ ​clear​ ​reflection​ ​of​ ​society​ ​within​ ​the​ ​contents​ ​of​ ​the​ ​various​ ​articles​ ​and​ ​advertisements​ ​in​ ​the magazine.​ ​The​ ​contents​ ​of​ ​the​ ​magazine​ ​will​ ​be​ ​analyzed​ ​to​ ​form​ ​a​ ​better​ ​idea​ ​on​ ​how​ ​the​ ​effects of​ ​segregation​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​Movement. While​ ​it​ ​seemed​ ​that​ ​equality​ ​was​ ​slowing​ ​becoming​ ​closer​ ​to​ ​a​ ​reality,​ ​1960​ ​was​ ​a​ ​time when​ ​segregation​ ​and​ ​discrimination​ ​was​ ​still​ ​prevalent​ ​within​ ​American​ ​society,​ ​and​ ​this​ ​is reflected​ ​in​ ​the​ ​articles​ ​in​ ​Ebony​.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​article​ ​“Lady​ ​Vice-Consul,”​ ​a​ ​picture​ ​of​ ​Lillie​ ​M. Hubbard​ ​shaking​ ​John​ ​Moors​ ​Cabot’s​ ​hand​ ​is​ ​shown​ ​to​ ​express​ ​Hubbard’s​ ​performance.​ ​This picture​ ​instills​ ​the​ ​belief​ ​that​ ​the​ ​black​ ​American’s​ ​success​ ​is​ ​only​ ​determined​ ​by​ ​white Americans.​ ​While​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​Hubbard​ ​has​ ​had​ ​this​ ​economic​ ​opportunity​ ​shows​ ​a​ ​step​ ​towards progress,​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​that​ ​one’s​ ​success​ ​is​ ​only​ ​determined​ ​by​ ​white​ ​America​ ​still​ ​remains​ ​deeply rooted​ ​in​ ​the​ ​beliefs​ ​of​ ​society.​ ​This​ ​particular​ ​article​ ​highlights​ ​the​ ​complex​ ​relationship America​ ​had​ ​with​ ​progress​ ​in​ ​1960.​ ​A​ ​further​ ​glimpse​ ​into​ ​the​ ​atmosphere​ ​of​ ​1960​ ​can​ ​be​ ​found in​ ​Nat​ ​King​ ​Cole’s​ ​article,​ ​“Why​ ​We​ ​Adopted​ ​Kelly.”​ ​Cole​ ​mentions​ ​how​ ​black​ ​parents​ ​have​ ​to go​ ​about​ ​raising​ ​their​ ​children​ ​with​ ​the​ ​current​ ​racial​ ​atmosphere​ ​of​ ​the​ ​nation.​ ​Cole​ ​said​ ​he​ ​has taught​ ​his​ ​daughters​ ​to​ ​be​ ​prepared​ ​for​ ​a​ ​number​ ​of​ ​discriminatory​ ​situations​ ​they​ ​could encounter​ ​in​ ​public​ ​so​ ​that​ ​they​ ​are​ ​not​ ​unaware​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world​ ​around​ ​them.​ ​Black​ ​children​ ​of Chris​ ​Biffar The​ ​Quest​ ​For​ ​Civil​ ​Rights 9/29/17 1960​ ​had​ ​to​ ​be​ ​painfully​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​society’s​ ​perception​ ​of​ ​them.​ ​It​ ​was​ ​only​ ​5​ ​years​ ​prior​ ​to​ ​the release​ ​of​ ​this​ ​issue​ ​that​ ​Emmett​ ​Till​ ​was​ ​brutally​ ​beaten​ ​and​ ​murdered​ ​for​ ​his​ ​interaction​ ​with​ ​a white​ ​women.​ ​Black​ ​children,​ ​especially​ ​those​ ​from​ ​the​ ​South,​ ​had​ ​to​ ​be​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​the​ ​animosity and​ ​hatred​ ​that​ ​existed​ ​towards​ ​them​ ​solely​ ​based​ ​on​ ​their​ ​race.​ ​Strong​ ​racial​ ​tensions​ ​could​ ​also be​ ​seen​ ​from​ ​the​ ​creation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​White​ ​Citizens​ ​Council​ ​in​ ​1954​ ​and​ ​the​ ​need​ ​to​ ​use​ ​the​ ​101st Airborne​ ​to​ ​escort​ ​the​ ​Little​ ​Rock​ ​9​ ​in​ ​1957.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​this​ ​world​ ​that​ ​Cole​ ​is​ ​having​ ​to​ ​prepare Natalie,​ ​Carol,​ ​and​ ​Kelly​ ​for.​ ​With​ ​this​ ​slow​ ​pace​ ​of​ ​progression,​ ​1960​ ​saw​ ​a​ ​few​ ​black Americans​ ​buying​ ​into​ ​ideas​ ​presented​ ​as​ ​truth​ ​in​ ​hopes​ ​that​ ​the​ ​racial​ ​atmosphere​ ​could​ ​be changed​ ​for​ ​them.​ ​In​ ​“Farewell​ ​To​ ​Daddy​ ​Grace”,​ ​we​ ​see​ ​black​ ​Americans​ ​buying​ ​into​ ​ideas​ ​that fill​ ​them​ ​hope.​ ​Daddy​ ​Grace​ ​stated​ ​that,​ ​“You​ ​don’t​ ​have​ ​to​ ​be​ ​no​ ​big​ ​doctor​ ​or​ ​lawyer​ ​to​ ​be somebody​ ​in​ ​the​ ​House​ ​of​ ​Prayer.​ ​Even​ ​if​ ​you​ ​can’t​ ​read​ ​or​ ​write,​ ​you​ ​got​ ​a​ ​voice​ ​in​ ​our church.”​ ​For​ ​black​ ​Americans​ ​who​ ​had​ ​endured​ ​through​ ​segregation​ ​and​ ​Jim​ ​Crow​ ​laws,​ ​pupil placement​ ​tests,​ ​and​ ​literacy​ ​tests,​ ​this​ ​was​ ​a​ ​new​ ​opportunity.​ ​It​ ​seemed​ ​that​ ​America​ ​was constantly​ ​taking​ ​black​ ​Americans’​ ​voice​ ​away,​ ​no​ ​matter​ ​their​ ​status.​ ​So​ ​Daddy​ ​Grace​ ​was​ ​seen as​ ​a​ ​beacon​ ​of​ ​hope​ ​for​ ​those​ ​who​ ​were​ ​desperately​ ​seeking​ ​their​ ​voice​ ​that​ ​had​ ​been​ ​taken​ ​away from​ ​them.​ ​This​ ​edition’s​ ​lack​ ​of​ ​integrated​ ​advertisements​ ​also​ ​give​ ​a​ ​glimpse​ ​into​ ​the​ ​racial atmosphere.​ ​With​ ​these​ ​articles’​ ​lack​ ​of​ ​progress​ ​and​ ​change​ ​evident​ ​within​ ​their​ ​content,​ ​they also​ ​give​ ​the​ ​readers​ ​some​ ​insight​ ​into​ ​the​ ​change​ ​that​ ​was​ ​taking​ ​place​ ​in​ ​society. The​ ​year​ ​of​ ​1960​ ​saw​ ​a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​positive​ ​change​ ​for​ ​the​ ​movement.​ ​While​ ​Cole​ ​did​ ​state​ ​in “Why​ ​We​ ​Adopted​ ​Kelly”​ ​that​ ​black​ ​parents​ ​had​ ​to​ ​make​ ​their​ ​kids​ ​aware​ ​of​ ​racial​ ​problems,​ ​he also​ ​went​ ​on​ ​to​ ​highlight​ ​the​ ​positive​ ​of​ ​the​ ​changing​ ​world.​ ​Cole​ ​states​ ​that​ ​times​ ​are​ ​getting better,​ ​and​ ​this​ ​is​ ​shown​ ​in​ ​1960​ ​with​ ​the​ ​creation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Student​ ​Nonviolent​ ​Coordinating Chris​ ​Biffar The​ ​Quest​ ​For​ ​Civil​ ​Rights 9/29/17 Committee​ ​(SNCC),​ ​which​ ​worked​ ​as​ ​a​ ​way​ to​ ​increase​ ​students​ ​participation​ ​and​ ​influence during​ ​the​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​movement.​ ​Earlier​ ​efforts​ ​such​ ​as​ ​the​ ​ruling​ ​of​ ​Brown​ ​vs.​ ​The​ ​Board​ ​of Education​,​ ​the​ ​Greensboro​ ​Sit-in,​ ​the​ ​creation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Southern​ ​Leadership​ ​Christian​ ​Conference (SLCC),​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Montgomery​ ​bus​ ​boycotts​ ​act​ ​as​ ​a​ ​catalyst​ ​of​ ​progress​ ​for​ ​1960.​ ​1960​ ​is​ ​a​ ​time when​ ​black​ ​Americans​ ​are​ ​beginning​ ​to​ ​gain​ ​more​ ​economic​ ​opportunity,​ ​such​ ​as​ ​James​ ​Cohen Del​ ​Rio.​ ​In​ ​“Young​ ​Man​ ​In​ ​A​ ​Hurry”,​ ​Del​ ​Rio’s​ ​rise​ ​to​ ​success​ ​is​ ​documented​ ​and​ ​illustrates how​ ​black​ ​Americans​ ​are​ ​slowly​ ​(snail’s​ ​pace)​ ​ ​gaining​ ​more​ ​economic​ ​opportunity.​ ​This​ ​would later​ ​be​ ​reinforced​ ​with​ ​the​ ​signing​ ​of​ ​Executive​ ​Order​ ​10925​ ​by​ ​JFK​ ​in​ ​1961​ ​and​ ​the​ ​passing​ ​of the​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​Act​ ​of​ ​1964. “Let​ ​there​ ​be​ ​love.”​ ​1960​ ​would​ ​have​ ​been​ ​a​ ​much​ ​easier,​ ​much​ ​more​ ​progressive​ ​time​ ​if America​ ​just​ ​took​ ​that​ ​advice​ ​from​ ​Nat​ ​King​ ​Cole.​ ​As​ ​indicated​ ​through​ ​the​ ​articles​ ​and​ ​lack​ ​of integrated​ ​advertisements,​ ​America​ ​did​ ​not​ ​just​ ​“let​ ​there​ ​be​ ​love”,​ ​which​ ​led​ ​to​ ​America’s complicated​ ​relationship​ ​between​ ​progress​ ​and​ ​injustice. Chris​ ​Biffar The​ ​Quest​ ​For​ ​Civil​ ​Rights 9/29/17 Bibliography "America's​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​Timeline​ ​|​ ​International​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​Center​ ​&​ ​Museum."​ ​The International​ ​Civil​ ​Rights​ ​Center​ ​&​ ​Museum​ ​–​ ​Explore​ ​the​ ​History​ ​of​ ​the​ ​American​ ​Civil​ ​Rights Movement.​ ​Accessed​ ​September​ ​29,​ ​2017. . Antonson,​ ​Rick.​ ​"The​ ​Road​ ​Of​ ​Dreams."​ ​In​ ​Route​ ​66​ ​Still​ ​Kicks:​ ​Driving​ ​America's​ ​Main​ ​Street​, 24.​ ​2013. “I​ ​am​ ​an​ ​American​ ​citizen​ ​and​ ​feel​ ​I​ ​am​ ​entitled​ ​to​ ​the​ ​same​ ​rights​ ​as​ ​any​ ​other​ ​citizen.” "The​ ​Greensboro​ ​Sit-In​ ​-​ ​Black​ ​History."​ ​HISTORY.com.​ ​Accessed​ ​September​ ​29,​ ​2017. . Harcourt,​ ​Felix.​ ​"Brown​ ​And​ ​Beyond."​ ​Presentation,​ ​History​ ​of​ ​Civil​ ​Rights,​ ​Austin​ ​College, Hopkins​ ​Center,​ ​September​ ​12,​ ​2017. Johnson​ ​Publication.​ ​Ebony​,​ ​April​ ​1960. mary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false. ...
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  • Fall '17
  • Felix Harcourt
  • 1960 Edition Of Ebony

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