INTRODUCTION_TO_THE_ANCIENT_WORLD

INTRODUCTION_TO_THE_ANCIENT_WORLD - INTRODUCTION TO THE...

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Unformatted text preview: INTRODUCTION TO THE ANCIENT WORLD: ROME 14/01/2008 13:29:00 Lecture 1: HOW AND WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE ROMANS I. Some modern perspectives A. Rome and America; Pax Romana and Pax Americana; some other identifications America/Rome: Founders' (e.g. Jefferson) admiration of Roman Republic (509- 31 B.C.) vs. decadent Empire (31 B.C. - A.D. 476) Constitution: checks and balances, veto arena spectacles; Colosseum (note spelling) B. Differences: mos maiorum [mores of the majors, i.e. elders) vs. progress; life expectancy; technology; acquisition of wealth; long-term vs. short- term perspectives C. The Romantic view: creative Greeks and Roman "imitators"; Greek and Roman temples D. The Romans as Stoics and decadents E. Rome as a melting pot; ecumenical [from oikumene]; peculium - peculiar F. Antiquity as inspiration: classicizing architecture, e.g. Disney HQ II. The tasks of the historian A. Documentation; modern vs. ancient B. Interpretation; revisionism (cf. historians on U.S. Presidents) III. Sources and evidence A. Literary: Greek and Roman historians, e.g. Plutarch (c. A.D. 50-120); his sources: 1. Official documents, e.g. Annales Maximi ["Greatest Annals"; from annus = year; cf. annual]; Gallic sack of Rome (390 B.C.) 2. Family archives and historians; their biases 3. Early Greek and Roman historians; their limitations B. Auxiliary disciplines 1. Archaeology; UT's excavations at Metaponto (southern Italy), Crimea (Ukraine), and Pylos (Greece); Institute of Nautical Archaeology at A&M 2. Inscriptions (epigraphy); lapidary 3. Coins (numismatics): EID MAR = Ides of March; but who looks at coins and bills: Annuit Coeptis, Novus Ordo Seclorum IV. Conclusion: how to use and interpret this evidence; cultural history vs. political and institutional history 14/01/2008 13:29:00 Lecture 2: THE ETRUSCANS (AND ROME) I. The Significance of the Etruscans ( most advanced civilization before the Romans) Romans are not cultural imperialist, only army wise) (of dual origins Romulus and ?) A. in their own right open up peninsula to influences of else where. Imports....
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INTRODUCTION_TO_THE_ANCIENT_WORLD - INTRODUCTION TO THE...

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