CognitiveBiases_CognitiveDissonance.pptx

CognitiveBiases_CognitiveDissonance.pptx - Short Writing...

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Short Writing Assignment 2 Due: Thursday, April 13th Write another short description of the same conflict you already wrote about Explain causes and content of the conflict HOWEVER, WRITE IT FROM THE OTHER PERSON’S PERSPECTIVE Imagine the other person got the last assignment, exactly what would they write? Keep it short: 3 pages, double-spaced
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Thinking about declaring psychology? SUPA and PsychConnect will be hosting a declaration workshop this Friday, 12-1PM, in Jordan Lounge. All years and those at any point in the process are welcome! PsychConnect peer advisors will be present to answer any questions. Want to become involved in the Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Association? Attend our weekly meetings, Mondays, 7-8PM in Old Union 220. Email [email protected] for more information.
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COGNITIVE BIASES: Cognitive Dissonance Theory Does this image blow your mind? Leon Festinger 1919-1989
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Cognitive Dissonance Humans have a strong tendency towards cognitive consistency Cognitive Dissonance Theory (Festinger 1957) (dominant theory in SP for 20 yrs) Holding apparently incompatible, or logically inconsistent, thoughts about ourselves, others, or the world produces cognitive dissonance The state of dissonance is uncomfortable The mind to resolve the discomfort by rejecting or changing one or more of the inconsistent cognitions Dissonance reduction goes on outside of awareness
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Cognitive Dissonance in Art Modern and “sophisticated” artwork tends to jar our sensibilities, challenge our assumptions, or otherwise create cognitive dissonance People tend to find this an acquired (or unacquirable) taste
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Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2
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Fountain
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Cognitive Dissonance in Music: Improvisational Jazz Cecil Taylor Ornette Coleman
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Cognitive Dissonance in Music: Punk Rock
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Cognitive Dissonance in Books, Movies Complex morality, lack of good/bad guys, anti-heroes, no happy endings, unreliable narrators Books: Ulysses, The Stranger, Catcher in the Rye, Crime and Punishment Movies: The Graduate, Pulp Fiction
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Cognitive Dissonance in TV
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Dissonance Reduction When people find their cognitions at odds or inconsistent somehow, they seek to resolve the dissonance (i.e., create consonance, or consistency) But how do you resolve dissonance between two thoughts, A and B? Stop believing one Change your belief in A or B (to not A, or not B) Distort one to fall in line with the other Add an additional cognition that resolves conflict Disregard, change belief, distort, or add Which one? Whichever is easiest
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Dissonance Reduction Example: a friend says
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