Lecture_Eight - Lecture 8: THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION I. The...

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Lecture 8: THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION I. The Roman Constitution: general characteristics: pragmatism and goodwill In the us we have a big connection with the roman constituions. II. Case in point: consul; veto; proconsul; imperium they alwas have two chief executives, they come from different orientations, they are the commanders but they also can convene the senate, separations of power is not the same, imperium means power, he can receive ambessies, he could look at the sky and have the augers help him. He can veto like everyone else. Term limit is one year, very nice constitution for a small city state, it become a innarcuate constitution when they become an empire, when you leave office you are automatically in the senate, they are not the upper house, they are purely advisory. It inhibates innovation, in the rest of their life they have to sit with those people for the rest of their lives, they don’t want to piss people off, don’t want to come off as a revolutionary. Second thing, you take the command over a roman province, you become
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course CC 302 taught by Professor Galinsky during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lecture_Eight - Lecture 8: THE ROMAN CONSTITUTION I. The...

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