2015_March_AHRI_Lessons in emotional intelligence - HRM online.pdf

2015_March_AHRI_Lessons in emotional intelligence - HRM online.pdf

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Unformatted text preview: W15 Lessons in emotional intelligence- HRM orline AHRICOM AU OTHER AHRI WEBSITES Search here FEATURED PROFILES OPINION LEGAL SPEOIALISTHR STRATEGIOHR HROAPABILITY AHRIBLOG OONNEOT HUMAN RESOURCES ME DlA Lessons in emotional intelligence TOPICS: ADAM GRANT DANIEL GOLEMAN El QUOTIENT EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE MANIPULATION By Carolyn Boyd written on March 10, 2015 A whole field of study and training has sprung up around the concept of emotional intelligence (El) since it started becoming popular 20 years ago. However, debate continues, with recently renewed vigour, as to whether El is a management enabler or disabler. In case you’ve somehow missed the buzz, E| is defined as the ability to monitor and discriminate between your own and other people’s emotions, and use that awareness in guiding your thinking and behaviour. One expert sums it up as “the ability to recognise, understand and manage emotions". Short courses, costing from a few hundred to thousands of dollars, train managers and workers to tap into their emotional knowledge to enhance reasoning, teamwork, management and decision-making. While coaches all over the world are paid big dollars to help business leaders nurture their El quotient (EQ), there are credible commentators who say organisations shouldn’t put too much stock in El. Some even see it as having a sinister dark side. Manipulation “New evidence shows that when people hone their emotional skills, they become better at manipulating others,” says Adam Grant, a professor of management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton business school. “When you’re good at controlling your emotions, you can disguise your true feelings. When you know what others are feeling, you can tug at their heartstrings and motivate them to act against their own best interests." At best, says Grant, El is “a set of skills that can be beneficial in situations where emotional information is rich or vital". At worst, unbridled enthusiasm for it could damage organisations that make the mistake of basing hiring or promotion decisions on it. Left unchecked, such enthusiasm can manifest in “Machiavellian” employees protecting their back, said Grant in ‘The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence’, an article he wrote for The Atlantic magazine’s January 2014 issue. rtlpwwww.hrmorfline.cun.au.flsecfim‘feahtedfleesoneemofimal4ntelligencel ENEWSLETTER SIGN UP MORE ON THIS TOPIC Fl AHRI: ASSIST Online resource centre fc Workplace Relations Workplace Relations AHRI:ASS|ST PROFESSIONAL DEVELU Events, conferences, trail EVENT: VIC Employee relations network SHORT COURSE: Rec workplace relations WEBINAR: Employmel Strategies to minimise employment litigation AHRI BOOKSHOP Browse through the Iates ORGANI TWEET, MANAG SOCIAL 11'3 3’30’2015 Lessors in emotional intelligence- HRM online Real world application In the other corner, there’s Daniel Goleman, the person responsible for popularising El through his 1995 bestseller Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. Goleman says Grant’s arguments miss the mark by being overly academic rather than focusing on the real “rubber-hits-the-road world of the workplace”. Anyone whose daily job makes them think about great performance will tell you El matters, he writes. “El is not just one single ability that we are good at or not — we can have strengths in one part of El — like excellent self-management, the key to self-discipline, achieving goals, and “grit” —while lacking in other parts, such as empathy or social skills. In fact that very pattern is common in the workplace, marking those who are outstanding individual performers (at programming, say) but who are not able to work well as part of a team or as a leader," says Goleman. Extended effort While there are plenty of El courses available, there is disagreement about whether it can really be taught. Schools are increasingly adopting El training to encourage children to talk about their emotions and recognise the feelings of others. The Yale Centre for Emotional Intelligence has developed a program for schools called RULER (an acronym for Recognising emotions, Understanding the causes, Labelling emotions accurately, Expressing appropriately and Regulating emotions effectively). The Yale centre‘s director, Marc Brackett, says the centre‘s overall goal is to create a more healthy, effective and compassionate world. ”We believe that everyone, from preschoolers to CEOs, should learn about El so they can thrive personally and professionally throughout their lives,” he says. Menges says that, while he’s waiting to see the long-term evidence, entrenohing such programs in schools could well help turn out adults with higher El because they are exposed to the approach over a long period of time. “It‘s probable that El can‘t be taught within a weekend, or even within a year of an MBA program. It takes extended effort," he says. ”We should caution those who think that, as managers, they can attend a seminar and improve their skills as emotion managers." This article is an edited version. The full article was first published in the March 2015 issue of HHMonth/y magazine as ‘Get along or get ahead’. AHRI members receive HRMonth/y 1 1 times per year as part of their membership. Find out more about AHH/ membership here. AHFll’s Ignition Training has a course on emotionally intelligent leadership. Find out more. TOPICS: ADAM GRANT DANIEL GOLEMAN El QUOTIENT EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE MANIPULATION COMMENT To comment on this article please provide your name and email address. Your email address will not be available publicly. Name * Email * Comment Post Comment MORE ARTICLES Euan RELATED ARTICLES February 27, LIZ DICKSON POSITIVE WI September 7, EMPLOYERS OPERATION March 3, 201 WORKPLACE ETHICS TAKI August 30, 2f MINDFULNE! THE BUZZWI September 2, COURTINC C DISMISSAL HFR‘P-FRT SMITH _ F REEHILLE WANT A MORE I4 EM POWERED & HEl TRENOING ARTICLES Mpzllwww.hrmodire.corn.a.dsecfiufieah1edfleesons-emofimal-intelligencel 3’30’2015 Lessons in emotional intelligence- HRM online HRM TV: N WORKPLA (516) HOW ELUS HOW ELUSIVE IS GOOD HR? (484) _ , A managing director ‘sacked’ his entire HR CKEate Car ”E“ _ ; department. An HR manager resigned {it} - - - - .‘ , ’ .. because Read more I. I HOW TO Rl LCJ L . . . L ,i' . ' ; - - ”I“ giggles .7 dowlopmant pray-ans mncshops whim EMPLOYEI be real punctual brand (381) HRM TV. KATE CARNELL pmtlngto h‘l'luenoa In this episode of HRM TV, Kate Carnell discusses the attributes she aspires to as Mum“ CEO of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Read more (9 CAN ANNL INTO SICK REDuum Communications (284) ENEWSLETTER SIGN UP What D'SC SW Want to be across the latest developments in the HR profession? Sign up for the weekly HRM e—newsletter to receive the latest news, tips and information. THE ARGUMENT AGAINST EXCELLENCE SHOULD THE CHRO CO? YES I Excellence as an idea that drives process Thought-leaders Ram Charan and Dave SIGN "P > improvement is wonderful, as long as the Ulrich created a stir on the topic of whether leaders... Read more ‘ HR shoul... Read more MAIN MENU OTHER AHRI WEBSITES SOCIAL ENEWSLETTER SIGN-UP Featured ahri.com.au SIGN UP I > Profiles AHRI National Convention Opinion -lR in Focus Conferences Legal AHRI Inclusion & Diversity Conference Specialist HR AHRI Awards Strategic HR gnition Training HR Capability -lR service providers Connect For SMEs COPYRIGHT © AUSTRALIAN HUMAN RESOURCES INSTITUTE 2014 PRIVACY POLICY TERMS AND CONDITIONS Mlpflwww.hrmoriir‘e.corn.a.flsecfiufieahredflessom-ernofimal-intelligencel 3:3 ...
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