Common Lit Road To Independence.pdf - Name Class The Road...

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Name:Class:"Declaration of Independence" is licensed under Public domain.The Road to American IndependenceBy Jessica McBirney2016The road to American revolution and independence was a long one, filled with obstacles and ending insurprising victory. The following text recounts this long road, starting with the very beginnings of Englishcolonization in North America to the final battle of the revolution. As you read, take notes on the structureof the text—how the information is grouped and ordered—and the significance of certain events in thecourse of the revolution.North America and the BritishEmpireIn the 1600s and 1700s, Great Britain held a vast1empire with colonies2all over the world. Theyestablished colonies to make money and gainpolitical and military power. Each colony had itsown leadership structure, but the Britishgovernment was always in charge.British explorers established colonies in NorthAmerica just like they did everywhere else.Different groups of people came to colonizeNorth America for different reasons. Forexample, rich investors founded colonies like Massachusetts in order to harvest natural resources andgain a profit. Other individual settlers came to the new colonies because they held certain religiousbeliefs that European governments would not tolerate, and they wanted to live under rulers whoshared their beliefs. Places like Rhode Island were safe havens for these groups.Life in the ColoniesThroughout the 1600s, British influence in North America continued to grow as more and morecolonists flooded the region. American colonists liked having fairly independent lives and governmentswhile still enjoying the economic benefits of being part of the British Empire. However, toward themiddle of the 1700s, tensions rose between the British government and the American people.[1]1.Vast(adjective):very large2.Colony(noun):a country or region under the control of another country and occupied by settlers of the controllingcountry1
Colonial UnrestBeginning in 1754, Britain fought the French and Indian War3on North American soil, and soon theyrealized they needed some way to pay for it. In order to raise money, they passed several taxes that allthe American colonies had to pay. Two of these were the Sugar Act4and the Stamp Act.5People had topay extra taxes on basic goods like sugar, tea, and paper.Unsurprisingly, all the colonists hated having to pay extra money for basic materials. They didn’t likehow Britain was using them just to collect money. They also believed the taxes were unfair becausethey had never elected their own representatives into the British government. They protested: “notaxation without representation.”6Many elites7wrote articles against the British government, but somefelt this was not enough. They refused to buy the taxed goods.On December 16, 1773, a group of men dressed up like Native Americans, sneaked onto a British shipdocked in Boston Harbor, and dumped crates of tea8

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