JIF Film Glossary.pdf - Note The following definitions are given to assist you in discussing aspects of a film You will probably not use all of them but

JIF Film Glossary.pdf - Note The following definitions are...

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Note: The following definitions are given to assist you in discussing aspects of a film. You will probably not use all of them, but using a term correctly will allow you to make yourself clearly understood. Note that there are often several terms for the same tech-nique; since the film industry is constantly develop-ing new techniques for making films, new terms will always be needed to describe such advances.Abrupt cut: see cutAbstract: (adj) the quality of a picture or scene that is in some significant way removed from everyday reality.Abstract (v/transitive): to select and highlight details, at the same time de-emphasizing or even omitting other details.Action(1.) activity or movement recorded on film; (2.) word called out to begin a take.Audio: the sound track usually consisting of at least one or more of the following: dialogue, background sounds, sound effects, music (background or natu-ral).Audio cut:(see sound edit or split edit).Available light:natural light at a location. Back-story:relevant events that happened prior to the time setting of the filmBoom: a long pole, usually counterbalanced, on which a microphone, camera, or light is attached al-lowing the instrument to be placed appropriately. Of-ten, a boom travels,or is moved as needed during shooting.Boom shot(also craneor helicoptershot): equip-ment used to create an extremely high angle shot; said to be a booming shot(or craning shotor heli-coptering) when the angle changes to higher or low-er position during the shot (“booming up to a higher vantage point, looking down on…”)Camera angle: the angle of the camera as it records a scene to suggesta particular emotion or attitude. Ex. an extremely low angle, looking up, suggests the strength and dominance (sometimes evil) of the sub-ject; aslight low-angle, looking up, suggests the strength and nobility of the subject; an extreme high-angle, looking down on the subject, suggests the weakness, perhaps pitifully so, of the subject; a mod-erate high-angle, looking down, suggests disdain for the subject. An eye-level shotis used when the camera is on the same level as the subject, usually seated standing; the suggestion is non-judgmental.Camera movement:when the camera changes lo-cation or angle during filming.Pans or panning shot:rotates horizontally on a stationary base (from panoramic”);dollies or adolly shot: camera moves in (forward) or out (backward) on a subject, usually by means of mounting on a dolly (a wheeled cart); tracks or atracking shot:the camera moves sideways such as with a walking person, often with the camera mounted on a long track for smooth movement.Cartoon(modern): a short animated film, usually humorous. Originally, artistic use: a preparatory full-size line drawing for a painting, fresco, or tapestry with colors suggested, if at all, only in broad strokes and without significant detail.
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