lecture 4-3 renal system I

lecture 4-3 renal system I - Trace this oxygen dissociation...

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As blood courses through the mother, oxygen is delivered to capillary beds for gas exchange , and by the time blood reaches the capillaries of the placenta, its oxygen saturation has decreased considerably. In order to recover enough oxygen to sustain itself, the fetus must be able to bind oxygen with a greater affinity than the mother. Trace this oxygen dissociation curve hemoglobin. . Now, add a 2 nd curve for fetal hemoglobin
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Why can’t we breathe in water? The first real success in fluid breathing came in 1966, with Dr. Leland Clark's "liquid-breathing-mouse" experiment. Dr. Clark realized that oxygen and carbon dioxide were very soluble in fluorocarbon liquids. Most of the animals who were kept in the fluid for up to an hour survived for several weeks after their removal, before eventually succumbing to pulmonary damage. Dr. Clark found that mice could survive longer in colder fluid - one animal survived over 20 hours breathing fluid at 18 o C. A living mouse “breathing” in fluorocarbon. Note goldfish in the water layer on top . Hypothesize – what was a big problem ?? Clark supposed CO 2 tended to build up in the system: It simply couldn't be removed fast enough due to the small airway passages
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Before leaving Chapter 42, refer to these pages for descriptions of the following: Lymphatic system …………. .p.878 Cardiovascular disease ……p.883 Insect tracheal system ……. .p.886 Diving mammal adaptions …p.894
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Learning objectives: • Understand what osmolarity means. • Describe the ultimate function of osmoregulation. • Explain how the osmoregulatory problems of freshwater animals differ from those of marine animals. • Describe some adaptations that reduce water loss in terrestrial animals.
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course BIO 311D taught by Professor Reichler during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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lecture 4-3 renal system I - Trace this oxygen dissociation...

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