projectile.docx - Projectile Motion lab Measure the velocity of a ball using two Photogates and computer software for timing Apply concepts from

projectile.docx - Projectile Motion lab Measure the...

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Projectile Motion lab • Measure the velocity of a ball using two Photogates and computer software for timing. • Apply concepts from two-dimensional kinematics to predict the impact point of a ball in projectile motion. Systemic
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PROCEDURE 1. Set up a low ramp made of angle molding on a table so that a ball can roll down the ramp, across a short section of table, and off the table edge as shown in Figure 1. 2 . Position the Photogates so the ball rolls through each of the Photogates while rolling on the horizontal table surface (but not on the ramp). Approximately center the detection line of each Photogate on the middle of the ball. Connect Photogate 1 to DIG/SONIC 1 of the interface and Photogate 2 to the corresponding second port. To prevent accidental movement of the Photogates, use tape to secure the ring stands in place. 3. Mark a starting position on the ramp so that you can repeatedly roll the ball from the same place. Roll the ball down the ramp through each Photogate and off the table. Catch the ball as soon as it leaves the table. Note: Do not let the ball hit the floor during these trials or during
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the following velocity measurements. Make sure that the ball does not strike the sides of the Photogates. Reposition the Photogates if necessary. 4. Open the file “08 Projectile Motion” in the Physics with Vernier folder. A data table and two graphs are displayed; one graph will show the time required for the ball to pass through the Photogates for each trial and the other will display the velocity of the object for each trial. 5. You must enter the distance, ∆ s, between Photogates in order for Logger Pro to calculate the velocity. The program will divide this distance by the time interval ∆ t it measures to get the velocity (v = ∆ s/ t ). Carefully measure the distance from the beam of Photogate 1 to the beam of Photogate 2. (It may be easier to measure from the leading edge of Photogate 1 to the leading edge of Photogate 2.) Double click on Gate Spacing and enter the measured distance.
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