txmi4290 exam 1 - Multiple choice T\/F and fill in the blank Peers taught powerpoint things in chapter are fair game Big vocab words from each

txmi4290 exam 1 - Multiple choice T/F and fill in the...

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Unformatted text preview: Multiple​ ​choice,​ ​T/F,​ ​and​ ​fill​ ​in​ ​the​ ​blank: Peers​ ​taught,​ ​powerpoint,​ ​things​ ​in​ ​chapter​ ​are​ ​fair​ ​game Big​ ​vocab​ ​words​ ​from​ ​each​ ​chapter:​ ​regardless​ ​of​ ​class​ ​time​ ​spent​ ​on​ ​it 4​ ​big​ ​motivations​ ​ ​of​ ​dress:​ ​what​ ​are​ ​they​ ​what​ ​do​ ​they​ ​mean Status:​ ​high​ ​or​ ​low, Protection:​ ​from​ ​nature,​ ​others,​ ​etc. Modesty:​ ​covering​ ​of​ ​body,​ ​not​ ​same​ ​across​ ​cultures Decoration:​ ​self​ ​expression,​ ​use​ ​of​ ​color,​ ​shape,​ ​line Difference​ ​of​ ​the​ ​way​ ​clothes​ ​are​ ​put​ ​together Draping​ ​(warmer,​ ​tucked​ ​and​ ​pinned)​ ​vs.​ ​tailoring​ ​(cooler) New​ ​inventions/tech​ ​that​ ​have​ ​shifted​ ​and​ ​changed​ ​how​ ​we​ ​learn/​ ​produce​ ​fashion Sewing​ ​machine,​ ​cameras/photography,​ ​movies/talkies Where​ ​people​ ​lived: Urbanization​ ​(more​ ​people,​ ​smaller​ ​living​ ​quarters),​ ​cars,​ ​driving​ ​changed​ ​fashion Where​ ​to​ ​get​ ​fashion​ ​info: Style​ ​leaders:​ ​Empress​ ​Éugenie,​ ​Queen​ ​Victoria Magazines,​ ​plates Fashion​ ​dolls​ ​(***) Queen​ ​Victoria: Mourning​ ​for​ ​Albert​ ​after​ ​his​ ​death,​ ​wore​ ​black​ ​all​ ​the​ ​time​ ​and​ ​changed​ ​it​ ​for​ ​others​ ​because she​ ​was​ ​a​ ​fashion​ ​leader Magazines: Goddy(i​ ​think​ ​this​ ​is​ ​suppose​ ​to​ ​be​ ​‘Godey’)​ ​and​ ​petersons Status: Slaves​ ​in​ ​the​ ​south:​ ​variations​ ​of​ ​dress​ ​between​ ​those​ ​enslaved​ ​and​ ​those​ ​who​ ​owned slaves,​ ​within​ ​slaves:​ ​house​ ​slaves​ ​(level​ ​down​ ​from​ ​master,​ ​still​ ​dressed​ ​up​ ​though)​ ​vs​ ​field slaves​ ​(rough​ ​clothing​ ​easy,​ ​to​ ​work​ ​in) People: Charles​ ​Worth:​ ​haute​ ​couture,​ ​founded​ ​the​ ​Chambre​ ​Syndicale​ ​de​ ​la​ ​Parisienne,​ ​governing body​ ​and​ ​being​ ​a​ ​fashion​ ​house​ ​in​ ​haute​ ​couture​ ​(created​ ​fashion​ ​houses),​ ​started​ ​the​ ​idea of​ ​separates** Paul​ ​Poiret:​ ​start​ ​of​ ​designer​ ​as​ ​we​ ​know​ ​it​ ​,​ ​hobble​ ​skirt,​ ​did​ ​away​ ​with​ ​corsets​ ​in​ ​his designs Fortuny:​ ​pleats-​ ​basically​ ​trademarked,​ ​famous​ ​dress​ ​(delphos​ ​gown-​ ​pleats​ ​and​ ​rolled​ ​up) Silhouette​ ​shift: Empire​ ​waistline​ ​under​ ​breast,​ ​romantic​ ​waist​ ​shifts​ ​down​ ​and​ ​silhouette​ ​less​ ​up​ ​and​ ​down and​ ​more​ ​hourglass​ ​type Crinoline:​ ​very​ ​exaggerated,​ ​hoop​ ​skirt Edwardian​ ​and​ ​bustle:​ ​shifts​ ​to​ ​the​ ​back​ ​and​ ​creates​ ​an​ ​s​ ​shape​ ​for​ ​the​ ​body,​ ​hair​ ​also mimics​ ​that​ ​(pompadour,​ ​mimics​ ​shirt​ ​and​ ​clothing) Sleeve​ ​shift:​ ​leg​ ​of​ ​mutton Mens: Similar​ ​in​ ​romantic​ ​period,​ ​hourglass,​ ​tapered​ ​in​ ​at​ ​waist,​ ​elaborate Silhouette:​ ​slims​ ​down​ ​to​ ​style​ ​more​ ​popular​ ​now,​ ​loose​ ​tuck​ ​at​ ​waist Vocab: Mens​ ​wear:​ ​mackintosh​ ​jacket​ ​(original​ ​rain​ ​jacket,​ ​named​ ​after​ ​person​ ​who​ ​made​ ​it),​ ​norfolk jacket​ ​(belted​ ​sport​ ​jacket),​ ​sac​ ​jacket​ ​(still​ ​used​ ​today,​ ​2​ ​outer​ ​pockets,​ ​business​ ​casual blazer),​ ​suspenders​ ​and​ ​knickers,​ ​(undergarments:​ ​knickerbockers) Womens:​ ​bloomers,​ ​bras,​ ​camisoles,​ ​bonnet,​ ​snood,​ ​gowns​ ​named​ ​for​ ​usage​ ​or​ ​time​ ​of​ ​day, Art​ ​movements: Art​ ​nouveau:​ ​floral,​ ​line,​ ​patterns,​ ​natural​ ​colors,​ ​direct​ ​correlation​ ​with​ ​fashion​ ​and​ ​interiors Arts​ ​and​ ​crafts Relationship​ ​to​ ​clothes:​ ​influences​ ​fashion​ ​which​ ​influences​ ​interiors,​ ​Zeitgeist​ ​(complex mixture​ ​of​ ​social,​ ​psychological,​ ​and​ ​aesthetic​ ​factors,​ ​spirit​ ​of​ ​the​ ​times) BIG​ ​KEY​ ​WORDS​ ​AND​ ​STUFF​ ​FROM​ ​EACH​ ​TIME​ ​PERIOD: The​ ​Romantic​ ​Period: Queen​ ​Victoria Westward​ ​expansion​ ​in​ ​US;​ ​cultivation​ ​of​ ​cotton​ ​(slavery) Stylish​ ​to​ ​look​ ​unhealthy Machines​ ​for​ ​lace​ ​production​ ​becoming​ ​more​ ​sophisticated Not​ ​yet​ ​enough​ ​ready-to-wear​ ​clothing​ ​for​ ​women;​ ​some​ ​for​ ​men Godey’s​ ​Lady​ ​Book​ ​and​ ​Peterson’s​ ​Magazine Photography Empire​ ​waistline​ ​moving​ ​lower Marie​ ​sleeve,​ ​demi-gigot​ ​sleeve,​ ​gigot/leg-of-mutton​ ​sleeve,​ ​imbecile/idiot​ ​sleeve A​ ​la​ ​chinoise​ ​hair​ ​(pulling​ ​back​ ​and​ ​side​ ​hair​ ​into​ ​knot​ ​at​ ​top​ ​of​ ​head​ ​while​ ​hair​ ​at​ ​forehead and​ ​temples​ ​was​ ​curled) Gilet​ ​corsage​ ​(like​ ​man’s​ ​waistcoat) Bishop​ ​sleeve,​ ​sleeve​ ​en​ ​bouffant,​ ​Victoria​ ​sleeve Ruchings Bonnets Bunch​ ​of​ ​different​ ​types​ ​of​ ​mantles Rubber​ ​galoshes Mittens​ ​and​ ​parasols Chatelaines​ ​(ornamental​ ​chains​ ​used​ ​to​ ​hang​ ​stuff)​ ​and​ ​Jeanette​ ​(hair​ ​or​ ​ribbon​ ​to​ ​suspend cross/pearls​ ​around​ ​neck) Men’s​ ​silhouette​ ​hourglass Newmarket​ ​(riding​ ​coat),​ ​Chesterfield,​ ​Mackintosh Top​ ​hats,​ ​gibus​ ​hat,​ ​derby​ ​hat Slave​ ​attire​ ​dependent​ ​on​ ​where​ ​one​ ​worked Less​ ​straight​ ​up​ ​and​ ​down​ ​and​ ​more​ ​hourglass The​ ​Crinoline​ ​Period: House​ ​of​ ​Worth Hoop​ ​skirt​ ​and​ ​very​ ​exaggerated Levi’s​ ​and​ ​Gold​ ​Rush Ideal​ ​woman=​ ​Queen​ ​Victoria,​ ​Empress​ ​Eugenie Women’s​ ​rights​ ​movement Civil​ ​War→​ ​spread​ ​of​ ​mechanization​ ​and​ ​factory​ ​system Spreading​ ​and​ ​improvement​ ​of​ ​sewing​ ​machines Bloomers Women’s​ ​clothing​ ​fit​ ​closely​ ​through​ ​bodice​ ​to​ ​waist​ ​and​ ​then​ ​widened​ ​into​ ​full​ ​round​ ​or dome​ ​shape Cage​ ​crinoline​ ​or​ ​hoopskirt “Dropped”​ ​shoulder Garibaldi​ ​blouse,​ ​Zouave​ ​jackets,​ ​raglan​ ​sleeves Princess​ ​dress Two-piece​ ​evening​ ​dresses Snood​ ​(net​ ​for​ ​daytime​ ​hair) Swiss​ ​belt Sack​ ​jacket,​ ​reefers/pea​ ​jackets Widened​ ​legs​ ​(for​ ​men)​ ​after​ ​1860 Knickerbockers Mustaches​ ​(1850s)​ ​and​ ​Stetson​ ​hats hoop→​ ​dome​ ​→​ ​pyramidal​ ​shaped​ ​skirts The​ ​Bustle​ ​Period​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Nineties: Women​ ​entering​ ​workforce​ ​and​ ​sports​ ​(especially​ ​cycling) Leg​ ​of​ ​mutton​ ​sleeve American​ ​frontier​ ​closing;​ ​lots​ ​of​ ​labor​ ​strife​ ​and​ ​poverty Prince​ ​of​ ​Wales​ ​popular,​ ​but​ ​Queen​ ​was​ ​too​ ​old-fashioned City​ ​life​ ​growing​ ​(first​ ​apartment​ ​building​ ​in​ ​NYC​ ​in​ ​1870) Weighting​ ​and​ ​mercerizing More​ ​ready-to-wear​ ​clothing pre-Raphaelite​ ​movement,​ ​Aesthetic​ ​movement,​ ​Art​ ​Nouveau 3​ ​different​ ​types​ ​of​ ​bustles 1870-1878→​ ​full​ ​bustle​ ​by​ ​manipulating​ ​drapery​ ​at​ ​back​ ​of​ ​skirt 1878-1883→​ ​sheath/cuirass​ ​bodice;​ ​fullness​ ​dropped​ ​below​ ​hips;​ ​semi-circular​ ​frame 1884-1890→​ ​large,​ ​rigid,​ ​shelf-like​ ​bustles Combination​ ​(chemise​ ​and​ ​drawers) Tea​ ​gown Princess​ ​polonaise Jersey​ ​fabric Camisoles,​ ​shirtwaist,​ ​tailor-mades Bathingsuits​ ​and​ ​cycling​ ​costumes Gibson​ ​Girl Pompadour Union​ ​suits​ ​(drawers​ ​and​ ​undervests​ ​in​ ​one​ ​garment) Norfolk​ ​jacket​ ​(belted​ ​sport​ ​jacket) Homburgs​ ​(fedora​ ​popularized​ ​by​ ​Prince​ ​of​ ​Wales) Deerstalker​ ​cap​ ​(Sherlock​ ​Holmes) Changing​ ​of​ ​mourning​ ​and​ ​black​ ​because​ ​of​ ​Queen​ ​Victoria→​ ​mourning​ ​crape The​ ​Edwardian​ ​Period​ ​and​ ​World​ ​War​ ​I: Paul​ ​Poiret​ ​and​ ​Mariano​ ​Fortuny​ ​in​ ​haute​ ​couture Women​ ​fight​ ​for​ ​and​ ​get​ ​right​ ​to​ ​vote Automobiles Sweater,​ ​trenchcoat,​ ​wristwatch Fashion​ ​magazines,​ ​steam​ ​and​ ​cruise​ ​lines,​ ​colleges​ ​and​ ​universities,​ ​different​ ​jobs Movies​ ​and​ ​movie​ ​stars Edward​ ​after​ ​Queen​ ​Victoria​ ​(ladies’​ ​man) World​ ​War​ ​I→​ ​sweaters,​ ​zipper​ ​outer​ ​jacket,​ ​trench​ ​coat,​ ​wristwatches,​ ​women​ ​in​ ​more practical​ ​clothes Exposition​ ​Universalle​ ​in​ ​Paris Poiret→​ ​did​ ​away​ ​with​ ​corsets,​ ​hobble​ ​skirts​ ​(very​ ​narrow​ ​and​ ​movement​ ​limiting​ ​hems), vivid​ ​colors,​ ​first​ ​to​ ​market​ ​perfume,​ ​didn’t​ ​adjust​ ​to​ ​newer​ ​lines Fortuny→​ ​Delphos​ ​gown​ ​(drew​ ​upon​ ​ancient​ ​Greek​ ​styles) Duster​ ​for​ ​driving Magazines​ ​showed​ ​“high​ ​society;”​ ​ready-to-wear​ ​allowed​ ​normal​ ​women​ ​to​ ​simulate​ ​“high society”​ ​styles ​ ​S-shaped​ ​silhouette→​ ​empire​ ​revival/hobble​ ​skirt→​ ​World​ ​War​ ​I→​ ​post-war​ ​styles Bras Lingerie​ ​dresses Ready-to-wear​ ​maternity​ ​dresses Bishop​ ​sleeve Goring​ ​(using​ ​a​ ​number​ ​of​ ​panels​ ​shaped​ ​so​ ​that​ ​they​ ​are​ ​fitted​ ​in​ ​some​ ​areas​ ​and​ ​flared​ ​in others) Pompadour​ ​(died​ ​down);​ ​perms;​ ​picture​ ​hats;​ ​juliet​ ​caps Skirts​ ​narrowed​ ​and​ ​grew​ ​shorter Lots​ ​of​ ​tunics→​ ​Paul​ ​Poiret​ ​designed​ ​minaret​ ​tunic​ ​(boned​ ​to​ ​hold​ ​out​ ​the​ ​skirt​ ​in​ ​full​ ​circle and​ ​worn​ ​over​ ​narrowest​ ​of​ ​hobble​ ​skirts) Pullover​ ​sweaters​ ​(Chanel) Elizabeth​ ​Arden,​ ​Madame​ ​C.J.​ ​Walker Chemise​ ​dress​ ​(straight​ ​tube​ ​dress​ ​popular​ ​in​ ​1920s)​ ​by​ ​Jeanne​ ​Lanvin Sports​ ​jackets​ ​(US)/​ ​lounge​ ​jackets​ ​(UK) Four-in-hand​ ​ties,​ ​ascots Narrowing​ ​of​ ​style;​ ​looks​ ​like​ ​what​ ​we​ ​see​ ​men​ ​in​ ​today Blazer​ ​(usually​ ​worn​ ​for​ ​tennis) Jodhpurs​ ​(trousers​ ​fitted​ ​closely​ ​around​ ​lower​ ​leg​ ​and​ ​flaring​ ​out​ ​above​ ​knee) Chapter​ ​12:​ ​The​ ​Romantic​ ​Period​ ​1820-1850 Expression​ ​of​ ​emotion,​ ​sentiment,​ ​and​ ​feeling​ ​were​ ​primary.​ ​invented​ ​the​ ​historical​ ​novel​ ​(Sir Walter​ ​Scott​ ​wrote​ ​Ivanhoe,​ ​and​ ​Alexander​ ​Dumas​ ​wrote​ ​three​ ​musketeers​ ​and​ ​the​ ​count​ ​of monte​ ​cristo.)​ ​Loved​ ​earlier​ ​times​ ​like​ ​the​ ​middle​ ​ages,​ ​violent​ ​emotions. King​ ​George​ ​IV​ ​to​ ​William​ ​IV​ ​to​ ​his​ ​niece​ ​Queen​ ​Victoria,​ ​who​ ​gave​ ​her​ ​name​ ​to​ ​an​ ​age​ ​(the Victorian​ ​era)-​ ​brought​ ​prestige​ ​back​ ​to​ ​the​ ​monarchy​ ​and​ ​earned​ ​respect​ ​and​ ​admiration​ ​of the​ ​English​ ​people. Bourban​ ​monarchy​ ​restored​ ​in​ ​France​ ​after​ ​the​ ​fall​ ​of​ ​Napoleon​ ​(Louis​ ​XVIII​ ​and​ ​then Charles​ ​X​ ​king​ ​who​ ​lacked​ ​common​ ​sense​ ​and​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​restore​ ​royal​ ​absolutism​ ​and​ ​led​ ​to revolution,​ ​he​ ​abdicated​ ​the​ ​throne​ ​and​ ​his​ ​grandson​ ​took​ ​over,​ ​and​ ​then​ ​Louis​ ​Napoleonnephew​ ​of​ ​Bonaparte-​ ​was​ ​elected​ ​president,​ ​succeeded​ ​in​ ​Second​ ​Republic/Second Empire​ ​in​ ​1852) Westward​ ​expansion​ ​begun​ ​in​ ​USA,​ ​Cultivation​ ​of​ ​cotton​ ​dominated​ ​the​ ​economy​ ​of​ ​the southern​ ​states​ ​and​ ​slavery​ ​flourished.​ ​Abolitionist​ ​societies​ ​became​ ​the​ ​basis​ ​for​ ​a movement.​ ​Although​ ​Americans​ ​were​ ​becoming​ ​politically​ ​independent​ ​of​ ​Europe,​ ​American people​ ​continued​ ​to​ ​follow​ ​the​ ​fashion​ ​in​ ​dress​ ​that​ ​originated​ ​abroad. Distinctly​ ​unstylish​ ​to​ ​appear​ ​in​ ​good​ ​health​ ​(used​ ​rice​ ​powder​ ​to​ ​appear​ ​pale,​ ​wanted​ ​circles under​ ​their​ ​eyes),​ ​middle​ ​class​ ​woman​ ​expected​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​perfect​ ​lady. Women’s​ ​role​ ​was​ ​increasingly​ ​confined​ ​to​ ​the​ ​home.​ ​Affluent​ ​women​ ​were​ ​severely​ ​limited in​ ​their​ ​activities.​ ​Required​ ​substantial​ ​wardrobe​ ​of​ ​fashionable​ ​clothes. working​ ​class​ ​women​ ​had​ ​more​ ​accommodating​ ​clothes,​ ​turned​ ​bonnet​ ​into​ ​sunbonnet,​ ​a practical​ ​covering​ ​to​ ​protect​ ​the​ ​face​ ​and​ ​head​ ​from​ ​the​ ​hot​ ​sun. Machines​ ​for​ ​producing​ ​lace​ ​had​ ​been​ ​gradually​ ​growing​ ​more​ ​sophisticated.-​ ​lower​ ​cost. ready​ ​made​ ​clothing​ ​for​ ​men​ ​continued​ ​to​ ​expand;​ ​however​ ​women​ ​could​ ​buy​ ​few ready-made​ ​garments​ ​other​ ​than​ ​corsets​ ​and​ ​cloaks. source​ ​of​ ​fashion:​ ​women’s​ ​magazines.​ ​ ​(introduced​ ​in​ ​Europe​ ​during​ ​18th​ ​century) Godey’s​ ​Lady’s​ ​Book ​(1830)​ ​and​ ​Peterson’s​ ​Magazine​ ​(1842) Louis​ ​Daguerre​ ​of​ ​France​ ​perfected​ ​his​ ​photographic​ ​process,​ ​fashionable​ ​to​ ​sit​ ​for​ ​their daguerreotypes,​ ​recorded​ ​styles,​ ​comparison​ ​of​ ​the​ ​idealized​ ​fashion​ ​plates​ ​and​ ​artists’ painted​ ​portraits​ ​with​ ​real​ ​clothing. 1820-1835:​ ​Empire​ ​styles​ ​to​ ​newer​ ​Romantic​ ​mode:​ ​waistline​ ​moved​ ​downward​ ​from​ ​just under​ ​the​ ​bust​ ​to​ ​several​ ​inches​ ​above​ ​the​ ​anatomical​ ​location​ ​of​ ​the​ ​waist.​ ​by​ ​1825 women’s​ ​dresses​ ​had​ ​developed​ ​large​ ​sleeves,​ ​and​ ​continued​ ​to​ ​grow​ ​larger,​ ​and​ ​gored skirts​ ​which​ ​were​ ​widening​ ​and​ ​becoming​ ​gradually​ ​shorter.​ ​Dress​ ​silhouettes​ ​placed​ ​greater emphasis​ ​on​ ​a​ ​small​ ​waist.​ ​Petticoats​ ​supported​ ​the​ ​ever-wider​ ​skirts. Bustles-​ ​small​ ​down-or​ ​bottom-filled​ ​pads​ ​that​ ​tied​ ​on​ ​around​ ​the​ ​waist​ ​at​ ​the​ ​back,​ ​held​ ​out skirts​ ​in​ ​back. dresses​ ​identified​ ​in​ ​magazines​ ​according​ ​to​ ​the​ ​time​ ​of​ ​day​ ​or​ ​activity​ ​intended​ ​for. Morning​ ​dresses-​ ​most​ ​informal,​ ​often​ ​being​ ​made​ ​of​ ​lingerie-type​ ​fabrics​ ​such​ ​as​ ​white cotton​ ​or​ ​fine​ ​linen​ ​with​ ​lace​ ​or​ ​ruffled​ ​trimmings.​ ​(day​ ​dresses,​ ​promenade,​ ​or​ ​walking dresses​ ​and​ ​carriage​ ​dresses​ ​ ​are​ ​often​ ​indistinguishable​ ​one​ ​from​ ​the​ ​other,​ ​especially​ ​in summer). sleeves: puffed​ ​at​ ​shoulder​ ​then​ ​attached​ ​to​ ​a​ ​long​ ​sleeve​ ​fitted​ ​to​ ​the​ ​wrist​ ​(mancherons)​ ​sometimes placed​ ​at​ ​shoulders,​ ​Marie​ ​sleeve-​ ​full​ ​to​ ​the​ ​wrist,​ ​but​ ​tied​ ​in​ ​at​ ​intervals​ ​with​ ​ribbons​ ​or bands,​ ​Demi-gigot-​ ​full​ ​from​ ​shoulder​ ​to​ ​elbow,​ ​then​ ​fitted​ ​from​ ​elbow​ ​to​ ​wrist,​ ​often​ ​with​ ​an extension​ ​over​ ​the​ ​wrist,​ ​gigot-​ ​also​ ​called​ ​Leg-of-mutton​ ​sleeves​ ​full​ ​at​ ​the​ ​shoulder, gradually​ ​decreasing​ ​in​ ​size​ ​to​ ​the​ ​wrist​ ​where​ ​they​ ​ended​ ​in​ ​a​ ​fitted​ ​cuff,​ ​Imbecile​ ​or​ ​idiot sleeves-​ ​extremely​ ​full​ ​from​ ​shoulder​ ​to​ ​wrist,​ ​where​ ​they​ ​gathered​ ​into​ ​a​ ​fitted​ ​cuff.​ ​(similar to​ ​that​ ​of​ ​sleeves​ ​used​ ​on​ ​garments​ ​for​ ​confining​ ​mad​ ​persons,​ ​strait​ ​jacket). waistlines​ ​remained​ ​straight​ ​with​ ​buckled​ ​belts​ ​or​ ​sashes​ ​at​ ​the​ ​waist​ ​until​ ​about​ ​1833​ ​and then​ ​V-shaped​ ​points​ ​used.​ ​length​ ​was​ ​either​ ​top​ ​of​ ​the​ ​foot,​ ​ankle​ ​length​ ​or​ ​shorter​ ​and then​ ​stopping​ ​at​ ​the​ ​instep.​ ​Also​ ​fuller​ ​skirts​ ​as​ ​time​ ​went​ ​on. Pelisse-robe:​ ​name​ ​given​ ​to​ ​a​ ​dress​ ​for​ ​daytime​ ​that​ ​was​ ​adapted​ ​from​ ​the​ ​pelisse​ ​that​ ​was worn​ ​outdoors.​ ​(sort​ ​of​ ​a​ ​coat​ ​dress​ ​that​ ​closed ​down​ ​the​ ​front) evening​ ​dresses​ ​differed​ ​from​ ​daytime​ ​dresses​ ​in​ ​details​ ​but​ ​not​ ​basic​ ​silhouette:​ ​necklines lower,​ ​sleeves​ ​shorter,​ ​skirts​ ​shorter. Accessories: Chemisettes/fillers/tuckers:​ ​raised​ ​the​ ​necklines​ ​of​ ​daytime​ ​dresses,​ ​separate​ ​from​ ​the​ ​dress and​ ​worn​ ​with​ ​different​ ​bodices. Pelerines:​ ​wide,​ ​cavelike​ ​collars​ ​that​ ​extended​ ​over​ ​the​ ​shoulders​ ​and​ ​down​ ​across​ ​the bosom. Fichu​ ​pelerine:​ ​variant​ ​of​ ​the​ ​pelerine,​ ​had​ ​two​ ​wide​ ​panels,​ ​or​ ​lappets,​ ​extending​ ​down​ ​the front​ ​of​ ​the​ ​dress​ ​and​ ​passed​ ​under​ ​the​ ​belt. Santon:​ ​a​ ​silk​ ​cravat​ ​worn​ ​over​ ​a​ ​ruff.,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​canezou Hair​ ​and​ ​Headdresses: parted​ ​down​ ​center​ ​front,​ ​tight​ ​curls​ ​and​ ​pulled​ ​into​ ​tight​ ​knot​ ​in​ ​back. à​ ​la​ ​Chinoise:​ ​1829​ ​style​ ​created​ ​by​ ​pulling​ ​back​ ​and​ ​side​ ​hair​ ​into​ ​a​ ​knot​ ​at​ ​the​ ​top​ ​of​ ​the head,​ ​while​ ​hair​ ​at​ ​forehead​ ​and​ ​temples​ ​was​ ​arranged​ ​in​ ​curls. day​ ​ ​caps,​ ​hats​ ​usually​ ​large​ ​brimmed​ ​with​ ​high,​ ​round​ ​crowns​ ​and​ ​large​ ​feather​ ​and​ ​lace decorations,​ ​bonnet​ ​styles,​ ​one​ ​bonnet​ ​a​ ​capote:​ ​had​ ​a​ ​soft​ ​fabric​ ​crown​ ​and​ ​a​ ​stiff​ ​brim. many​ ​hair​ ​ornaments​ ​used:​ ​jewels,​ ​tortoise​ ​shell​ ​combs,​ ​ribbons,​ ​flowers,​ ​and​ ​feathers. evening:​ ​hair​ ​ornaments,​ ​berets​ ​and​ ​turbans. 1836-1850:​ ​silhouette​ ​gradually​ ​became​ ​more​ ​subdued,​ ​sleeve​ ​was​ ​like​ ​a​ ​balloon​ ​that​ ​was deflating,​ ​but​ ​still​ ​fullness​ ​was​ ​apparent​ ​in​ ​sleeve,​ ​it​ ​moved​ ​lower​ ​on​ ​the​ ​arm​ ​until​ ​about 1840​ ​when​ ​sleeves​ ​became​ ​narrower​ ​and​ ​more​ ​closely​ ​fitted. skirts​ ​lengthened,​ ​and​ ​became​ ​heavier,​ ​bodices​ ​generally​ ​ended​ ​at​ ​the​ ​waist. Gilet​ ​corsage:​ ​made​ ​in​ ​imitation​ ​of​ ​a​ ​man’s​ ​waistcoat. most​ ​sleeves​ ​were​ ​set​ ​low​ ​and​ ​off​ ​the​ ​shoulder​ ​after​ ​1838. Bishop​ ​sleeve:​ ​made​ ​with​ ​a​ ​row​ ​of​ ​vertical​ ​pleats​ ​at​ ​the​ ​shoulder​ ​that​ ​released​ ​into​ ​a​ ​soft,​ ​full sleeve​ ​gathered​ ​to​ ​a​ ​fitted​ ​cuff​ ​at​ ​the​ ​wrist,​ ​popular​ ​until​ ​about​ ​1840. Sleeve​ ​en​ ​bouffant/en​ ​sabot:​ ​alternated​ ​places​ ​of​ ​tightness​ ​with​ ​puffed​ ​out​ ​expansions. Victoria:​ ​had​ ​a​ ​puff​ ​at​ ​the​ ​elbow,​ ​variant​ ​of​ ​sleeve​ ​en​ ​bouffant. shape​ ​of​ ​skirts​ ​was​ ​full​ ​and​ ​gathered​ ​into​ ​the​ ​waist.​ ​Pockets​ ​added​ ​into​ ​skirts. trimmings​ ​included​ ​Ruchings:​ ​pleated​ ​or​ ​gathered​ ​strips​ ​of​ ​fabric-flounces,​ ​scallops,​ ​and wordings. Silhouette​ ​of​ ​evening​ ​dresses​ ​was​ ​similar​ ​to​ ​daytime:​ ​made​ ​with​ ​off-the-shoulder​ ​necklines that​ ​extended​ ​straight​ across​ ​or​ ​en​ ​coeur,​ ​made​ ​with​ ​a​ ​dip​ ​at​ ​the​ ​center,​ ​many​ ​had​ ​berthaswide,​ ​deep​ ​collars​ ​following​ ​neckline. Hair​ ​and​ ​Headdresses: parted​ ​in​ ​the​ ​middle,​ ​pulled​ ​smoothly​ ​to​ ​the​ ​temples​ ​were​ ​it​ ​was​ ​arranged​ ​in​ ​hanging, sausage-shaped​ ​curls​ ​or​ ​in​ ​plaits​ ​or​ ​with​ ​a​ ​loop​ ​of​ ​hair​ ​encircling​ ​the​ ​ears.​ ​at​ ​the​ ​back​ ​it​ ​was pulled​ ​into​ ​a​ ​bun​ ​or​ ​chignon. adult​ ​women​ ​also​ ​wore​ ​small​ ​white​ ​cotton​ ​or​ ​linen​ ​caps​ ​indoors.​ ​(bonnets​ ​predominantly). Bavolet:​ ​ruffle​ ​at​ ​the​ ​back​ ​of​ ​the​ ​neck​ ​to​ ​keep​ ​the​ ​sun​ ​off​ ​the​ ​neck. to​ ​make​ ​bonnets​ ​more​ ​fashionable​ ​they​ ​often​ ​were​ ​worn​ ​with​ ​veils​ ​attached​ ​to​ ​base​ ​of​ ​the crown.​ ​Drawn​ ​bonnets:​ ​fashionable​ ​bonnet​ ​made​ ​from​ ​concentric​ ​circles​ ​of​ ​metal, whalebone,​ ​or​ ​cane​ ​and​ ​covered​ ​in​ ​silk. outdoor​ ​garments: mantle/shawl-mantle:​ ​a​ ​short​ ​garment​ ​rather​ ​like​ ​a​ ​hybrid​ ​between​ ​a​ ​shawl​ ​and​ ​a​ ​short mantle​ ​with​ ​points​ ​hanging​ ​down​ ​at​ ​either​ ​side​ ​ ​of​ ​the​ ​front. Pelerine-mantle:​ ​with​ ​a​ ​deep​ ​cape,​ ​coming​ ​well​ ​over​ ​the​ ​elbows​ ​and​ ​having​ ​long,​ ​broad​ ​front lapels​ ​worn​ ​over,​ ​not​ ​under,​ ​a​ ​belt. Burnous:​ ​a​ ​large​ ​mantle​ ​of​ ​about​ ​three-quarter​ ​length​ ​with​ ​a​ ​hood,​ ​the​ ​name​ ​and​ ​style deriving​ ​from​ ​a​ ​similar​ ​garment​ ​worn​ ​by​ ​arabs​ ​who​ ​lived​ ​in​ ​middle-east​ ​deserts. Paletot:​ ​about​ ​knee​ ​length​ ​and​ ​having​ ​three​ ​capes​ ​and​ ​slits​ ​for​ ​the​ ​arms Pardessus:​ ​a​ ​term​ ​applied​ ​to​ ​any​ ​of​ ​a​ ​number​ ​of​ ​garments​ ​for​ ​outdoor​ ​wear​ ​that​ ​had​ ​a defined​ ​waistline​ ​and​ ​sleeves​ ​and​ ​were​ ​from​ ​one​ ​half​ ​to​ ​three-quarters​ ​in​ ​length. Footwear: stockings,​ ​for​ ​evening​ ​black​ ​silk​ ​stockings​ ​were​ ​fashionable slipper​ ​type,​ ​square​ ​toe​ ​after​ ​late​ ​1820s small​ ​heels​ ​applied​ ​in​ ​late​ ​1840s,​ ​when​ ​ribbon​ ​sandals​ ​and​ ​white​ ​satin​ ​evening​ ​boots appeared. in​ ​cold​ ​weather​ ​wore​ ​leather​ ​shoes​ ​or​ ​boots​ ​with​ ​cloth​ ​gaiters​ ​(a​ ​covering​ ​for​ ​the​ ​upper​ ​part of​ ​the​ ​shoe​ ​and​ ​the​ ​ankle). Rubber​ ​Galoshes:​ ​or​ ​overshoes​ ​were​ ​introduced​ ​in​ ​late​ ​1840s. Accessories: gloves,​ ​long​ ​until​ ​second​ ​half​ ​of​ ​the​ ​1830s​ ​and​ ​then​ ​shortened.​ ​those​ ​cut​ ​to​ ​cover​ ​the​ ​palm and​ ​back​ ​of​ ​the​ ​hands​ ​but​ ​not​ ​fingers​ ​are​ ​called​ ​mittens​ ​or​ ​mitts. hand​ ​carried​ ​accessories:​ ​reticules,​ ​handbags,​ ​purses,​ ​fans,​ ​muffs,​ ​and​ ​parasols,​ ​and carriage​ ​parasols​ ​with​ ​folding​ ​handles. Jewelry: gold​ ​chains​ ​(1820-30s)​...
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