FC_Notes_Chapter31.doc - Instructor Notes Chapter 31(The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Instructor Notes: Chapter 31 (The West Since World War II) This chapter surveys the decades since the end of World War II, years which have witnessed extraordinary changes both in Europe and the world it once dominated. The continent was permanently divided into two spheres, each dominated by a peripheral power: the west by the United States, the east by the Soviet Union. European countries which had held colonial empires since the Renaissance lost their overseas possessions, apparently for good, but the period has also witnessed new European initiatives. Nations began to cooperate economically and politically with each other to an unprecedented degree, which helped bring Europe the most extensive material prosperity in its history. Moreover, although the relative power of Europe has clearly declined since 1939,its influence overseas has continued. The United States and the Soviet Union played out their hostilities in all measures short of actual fighting, hence the term, Cold War. It became clear that the United Nations would not solve the world’s problems. The next year, in its Truman Doctrine, the United States promised to support any nation resisting Communist subversion. Its Marshall Plan pumped new life into the war shattered economies of Western Europe. The Soviet Union responded with a new revolutionary organization Cominform, and replaced multi–party regimes in Eastern Europe with thoroughly Communist ones. The United States, in turn, decided to set up an anti–Soviet state in the western zones of Germany. Despite Russian pressure on Berlin in 1948 and 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was created in the latter year. With the establishment of NATO in the west in 1949, and COMECON and then the Warsaw Pact in the east, the division of Europe into two was complete. World War II left a power vacuum in Europe. Previously, Britain, France and Germany had been not only Europe’s leaders, but world powers. Their weakness after 1945 left them subordinate to the United States and Soviet Union. The continent became an arena for the rivalries of the two superpowers. The first round of Cold War saw the formation of NATO (1949) and American intervention in Korea (1950). The year 1956 increased Cold War tensions, while revealing Europe’s weakness. Neither Western Europe, as the Franco–British Suez invasion showed, or eastern Europe, as the abortive Polish and Hungarian revolts showed, could break free from dependence on the superpowers. In Europe and the world, the Cold War continued unabated until the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. American–Soviet rivalry centered around such events as the Vietnam War (1961–
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern