Phys Descartes On Collision

Phys Descartes On Collision - P 2305 Y11-$!8 4 Chronology...

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P !"# 2305 Y11- $! 8 4 Chronology : Galileo (1564-1642) Descartes (1596-1650) Huyghens (1629-1697) Newton (1642-1727) Below you will have fun. present formulation, or with experiments, one has to add an interpretation of some terms and to make some assumptions since Descartes is vague at places. Assume that if B were slightly larger than C is to be interpreted as if mass of B is slightly larger than that of C² ) Descartes’ Laws of Collision m B = m C and u B = u C : First , if these two bodies, for example B and C, were completely equal in size and were moving at equal speeds, B from right to left, and C toward B in a straight line from left to right; when they collided, they would spring back and subsequently continue to move, B toward the right and C toward the left, without having lost any of their speed. For, in this case, there is no cause which could take their speed from them, but there is a very obvious one which must force them to spring back; and because it would be equal in each, they would both spring back in the same way. m
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course PHYS 2305 taught by Professor Tschang during the Spring '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Phys Descartes On Collision - P 2305 Y11-$!8 4 Chronology...

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