GEO 101 C Module 8 Portfolio (2).docx - Running head GEO 101C MODULE 8 PORTFOLIO Weather Anomalies Hurricanes GEO 101C Earth Science with Lab Colorado

GEO 101 C Module 8 Portfolio (2).docx - Running head GEO...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 11 pages.

Running head: GEO 101C MODULE 8 PORTFOLIO 1 Weather Anomalies, Hurricanes GEO 101C – Earth Science with Lab Colorado State University – Global Campus 2017
Image of page 1
WEATHER ANOMALIES, HURRICANES 2 Weather Anomalies, Hurricanes Hurricanes are one of the earths deadliest and devastating storm. Hurricanes are part of the vortex family, which includes typhoons, cyclones and tornadoes. This paper will define them, compare them to normal conditions and discuss the consequences of each. It will review past hurricane and the weather they create. An analysis of a hurricanes economic impact, damage to the Earth, and any long-term consequences. Hurricanes are natural weather phenomenon. They are part of a weather cycle driven by the Sun, Earth, and to some degree human activity. Hurricane Formation Hurricanes are rotating tropical storms found in the Atlantic Ocean and Eastern Pacific oceans. When this weather phenomenon is found in the Northern Indian Ocean or the Bay of Bengal, it is considered a cyclone and when found in the western Pacific Ocean, it is called a typhoon. National Geographic (2017) defines the origins of the word hurricane “Centuries ago, the Spanish used Huracan, an indigenous word for evil spirits and weather gods, to name the storms that sank their ships in the Caribbean” (para. 3). Hurricanes are formed in warmer waters of at least 80 degrees or higher and typically begin as a tropical event. The warm water feeds the low-pressure storm until the winds reach speeds upward of 38 miles per hour and then becomes a tropical depression. WW2010 Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) (n.d.) states “a tropical depression has at least one closed isobar that accompanies a drop-in pressure in the center of the storm” (para.1). Once the winds of the storm reach 39 miles per hour with sustained force, it becomes a tropical storm and is named. WW2010 Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) (n.d.) describes the appearance as “Tropical storms resemble the appearance of hurricanes due to the intensified circulation” (para. 2). The storm has to nearly double its wind speed to a sustained 74 miles per hour to be categorized as a hurricane. It is then given a one
Image of page 2
WEATHER ANOMALIES, HURRICANES 3 through five rating on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. WW2010 Department of Atmospheric Sciences (DAS) (n.d.) describes the appearance and heaviest rainfall producing location as “A pronounced rotation develops around the central core as spiral rain bands rotate around the eye of the storm. The heaviest precipitation and strongest winds are associated with the eye wall” (para. 3). The hurricane draws its energy through the heat of the warm water and turns it into condensation, creating very large thunderstorms. The circular destructive storm revolves around a twenty to thirty-mile-wide eye which is surprisingly calm. When hurricanes hit land, they can produce storm surges that reach twenty feet high and can go inland about 100 miles. National Geographic (2017) talks about the potential devastating weather a hurricane brings “Hurricanes
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture