Lecture 2-19 grg sec2 - Lecture 2-19 Types of Clouds High...

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Lecture 2-19 Types of Clouds High Level Moderate Level Lower Level Vertical Extent VE(based on unstable air) – goes wherever it wants Clouds are natures way of sending us messages about the weather Latin Roots used to name clouds… VERY IMPORTANT Stratus – “layer” – more stable Cumulus – “heap” (piled up) – rising air more unstable Cirrus – “curl of hair” – horse tails- High level Nimbus – “violent rain” – precipitation High Levels ( AOA 20,000 AGL) – middle latitudes Cirrus- (Ci)- thin, whispy clouds blown by high winds aloft into long streamers -waves or masses of mostly ice crystal (some supercooled water droplets) -fair weather unless they thicken into altostratus (Ac) -nickname is “mare’s tales” -usually west to east with upper level (jet stream) winds -don’t move quickly cuz they are high -no precipitation at the ground Cirrocumulus- (Cc)- small rounded white puffs that can occur individually or in long rows -can resemble scales -can indicate instability at upper levels of atmosphere - nickname is “mackerel sky” because of the scaly appearance -no precipitation at the ground Cirrostratus- (Cs) – thin sheet-like cloud often covering entire sky, shadows still cast at the ground -Always present when there is a Solar or Lunar halo -Fair weather clouds unless they thicken to altostratus (As)
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Virgo- precipitation that evaporates before it hits ground esp. in high sky Middle Level Clouds (6,500 – 20,000’ AGL) Altocumulus- (Ac)- gray, puffy masses sometimes rolled out in parallel waves or band -refer to “rising castles” (called castellanus) indicate sign of mid-level instability -not really any precipitation at ground Altostratus –(As) – gray to blue-gray (never white) cloud layer that often covers the entire sky -no shadows cast at the ground -not really any precipitation at ground however -usually form in advance of storms that produce much widespread and continuous
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Lecture 2-19 grg sec2 - Lecture 2-19 Types of Clouds High...

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