Do you think liberal international order will survive in its current form over the next 30 years.doc

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Do you think liberal international order will survive in its current form over the next 30 years? If so, how will it sustain structural changes like the rise of new great powers? If not, how exactly will the nature of international order change? And what are the major forces that will drive this change?The liberal order will survive in its current form over the next 30 years. This international order is the product of centuries of struggle and innovation. It is an integrated, expansive, highly institutionalized system and deeply rooted in the societies and the economies of the advanced capitalist and developing nations. So, even as China and other rising states try to contest U.S. leadership—and there is indeed a struggle over the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of the leading states within the system—the deeper international order remains intact. Rising powers are finding incentives and opportunities to engage and integrate into this order, doing so to advance their own interests. For these states, the road to modernity runs through—not away from—the existing international order.Today’s international order is the product of two projects dating way back in history. The two projects have worked together. The Westphalian project has focused on solving the “realist” problems of creating stable and cooperative interstate relations under conditions of anarchy, and the liberal-order-building project has been possible only when relations between the great powers have been stabilized. The “problems of Hobbes,” that is, anarchy and power insecurities,have had to be solved to take advantage of the “opportunities of Locke,” that is, the construction of open and rule-based relations. The liberal international order provides principles of restraints and accommodation that serves the interest of the competing states. A one world vision of nation states that would trade and interact in a multilateral system of laws. Another aspect of the liberal international order is that, after WW II through the creation of the United Nations, the universal inalienable rights of all men were ensured. These civil rights translate into benefits for the people of the entire world not only the Americans. So, the two key aspects of the international order: the role of the institutions in facilitating free trade and establishing the rule of law and the universal human rights are not inherently ‘American’. Emerging powers, which might eventually replace America in the global arena as leaders, have reaped significant benefits from this order and will hope to do so in the future. The fact that America has built this system and been the leader of it for a long time, portrays a picture of the entire liberal order being American in the first place; but take America away from the picture, this system has still significant amount of benefits to offer to whoever takes the lead. One might ask, what benefits will a rising China receive from a liberal international order

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