Cambridge Paper 1 Secret Life of Walter Mitty.pdf - Cambridge International Examinations Cambridge International Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level

Cambridge Paper 1 Secret Life of Walter Mitty.pdf -...

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This document consists of 7 printed pages, 1 blank page and 1 Insert. DC (RCL (JDA)) 130816/2 © UCLES 2017 [Turn over Cambridge International Examinations Cambridge International Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced Level * 1 3 4 9 2 2 8 7 1 4 * ENGLISH LANGUAGE 9093/13 Paper 1 Passages May/June 2017 2 hours 15 minutes No Additional Materials are required. READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST An answer booklet is provided inside this question paper. You should follow the instructions on the front cover of the answer booklet. If you need additional answer paper, ask the invigilator for a continuation booklet. Answer two questions: Question 1 and either Question 2 or Question 3. You should spend about 15 minutes reading the passages and questions before you start writing your answers. You are reminded of the need for good English and clear presentation in your answers. The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.
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2 9093/13/M/J/17© UCLES 2017Answer Question 1 and eitherQuestion 2 orQuestion 3.1 The following passage is the opening of a short story, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, by James Thurber. Walter Mitty, a middle-aged man, lives more in his imagination than in reality.(a) Comment on the language and style of the passage and the way in which Walter Mitty is presented. [15](b) Write a continuation (120–150 words) of the story. You should base your answer closely on the style and language of the original passage. You do not have to bring your writing to a conclusion. [10]‘We’re going through!’ The Commander’s voice was like thin ice breaking. He wore his full-dress uniform, with the heavily braided white cap pulled down rakishly over one cold grey eye. ‘We can’t make it, sir. It’s spoiling for a hurricane, if you ask me.’ ‘I’m not asking you, Lieutenant Berg,’ said the Commander. ‘Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8,500! We’re going through!’ The pounding of the cylinders increased: ta-pocketa-pocketa-pocketa pocketa-pocketa. The Commander stared at the ice forming on the pilot window. He walked over and twisted a row of complicated dials. ‘Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!’ he shouted. ‘Switch on No. 8 auxiliary!’ repeated Lieutenant Berg. ‘Full strength in No. 3 turret!’ shouted the Commander. ‘Full strength in No. 3 turret!’ The crew, bending to their various tasks in the huge, hurtling eight-engined Navy hydroplane, looked at each other and grinned. ‘The Old Man’ll get us through,’ they said to one another. ‘The Old Man ain’t afraid of Hell!’‘Not so fast! You’re driving too fast!’ said Mrs Mitty. ‘What are you driving so fast for?’‘Hmm?’ said Walter Mitty. He looked at his wife, in the seat beside him, with shocked astonishment. She seemed grossly unfamiliar, like a strange woman who had yelled at him in a crowd. ‘You were up to fifty-five,’ she said. ‘You know I don’t like to go more than forty. You were up to fifty-five.’ Walter Mitty drove on toward Waterbury in silence, the roaring of the SN 202 through the worst storm in twenty years of Navy flying fading in the remote, intimate airways of his mind. ‘You’re tensed up again,’ said Mrs Mitty. ‘It’s one of your days. I wish you’d let Dr Renshaw look
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