English Paper 3 Final - Jaworski 1 Jordan Jaworski Professor Ready English 1050 The Beats and their Spawn 23 November 2015 How the Beat Generation

English Paper 3 Final - Jaworski 1 Jordan Jaworski...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Jaworski 1 Jordan Jaworski Professor Ready English 1050: The Beats and their Spawn 23 November 2015 How the Beat Generation Changed Music As a result of their controversial and often provocative ideas, the Beat generation’s leaders quickly captured attention and criticism as they rose to fame in 1950’s America. They were openly criticized as they defied the standards of conformity that plagued society at this time. However, as America moved into the 1960’s, society moved away from conformity and began to embrace originality and liberation. Counterculture movements, such as the Hippies, were celebrated and it became conventional to question the government as well as society. As a result, many musical artists who rose to fame at this time embraced a more alternative and less conventional musical style. This can be seen by the introduction and rise of rock and roll and folk music. These artists gathered influence from the original anti-establishment ideas of the Beat Generation. They were inspired by their ability to speak their minds freely on controversial topics, such as sex, drugs, and war. As seen by the similarities in their values and themes, Bob Dylan and the Beatles were heavily influenced by the Beat Generation. Bob Dylan, who is often cited as a Beat poet himself, is one of the most obvious musical artists that was influenced by the Beats. In fact, Dylan “cited both Ginsberg and Kerouac as major influences and commented that On the Road changed his life just like it changed everyone else’s” (Chastain 5). Dylan’s song, “Desolation Row,” clearly shows how influenced he was by the Beats. First and foremost, it has some lines that are from Jack Kerouac’s Desolation Angels “nearly verbatim, such as ‘a perfect image of priest’ and ‘her sin is her lifelessness’” (Dennis 10). This shows just how much Dylan respected Kerouac. These lines are a direct tribute to him. Overall, the song has a message of isolation as it describes numerous characters and historical
Jaworski 2 figures, such as the Phantom of the Opera, Einstein, Cinderella, and Romeo, who are stuck on Desolation Row. One example is Cinderella: And in comes Romeo, he’s moaning, “You belong to Me I Believe.” And someone says, “You’re in the wrong place, my friend You’d better leave.” And the only sound that’s left

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture