Masks, Tiberius, and Mummies.docx - Orr 1 Suzanna Orr...

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Orr 1 Suzanna Orr Frederick Atkins Tuesday, July 25, 2017 Masks, Tiberius, and a Mummies For my paper for Anthropology, I chose to visit the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University in Atlanta. I had never had the opportunity to visit this museum, even though I have lived in Georgia all my life. I thought what better of an opportunity to visit and see all the artifacts that the museum had on display. The exhibits that I could view were the Americas, Egypt, Rome, and Africa. I really enjoyed the Egypt and Rome exhibits the most, partly because I learned about these early cultures in a World History to 1500 class last semester. I have chosen to write about the Death Transformation Masks from Costa Rica, the sculpture of the head of Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus, and an Egyptian mummy. The first exhibit that I viewed was the Americas. There was a lot of pottery, jewelry and tools in this exhibit. The most interesting thing that I found though were Death Masks from Costa Rica. In the Ameridans, one of the central beliefs is that life does not necessarily end at death, but that the soul travels to an afterlife. A person’s body parts and personal belongings were believed to be important for the afterlife. Burials for the deceased tended to be more luxurious and with more phases that what we are used to experiencing today. According to records from early Spanish colonists, there was a “three-day funeral for the Panamanian supreme Chief Parita” (Carlos). Family members were sacrificed also to join him in the journey to the afterlife. The chief’s preserved bones were then decorated with his gold jewelry and then buried. In Central and Northern South America, some cultures practiced an extra type of burial. In this process, the body would de-flesh, and the bones would be placed in an urn with gold.
Orr 2 The Costa Rican masks show a mixture of life and death. “The head has plump cheeks and full lips as if alive” (Carlos). The closed eyes tend to be the only sign of death. “The masks retain cheeks and lips (especially in 1), yet the eyes are only sockets” (Carlos). In mask number

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