Thurow_12042007 - Thurow Chapters 6, 7 and 8 The 3rd World...

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1 Thurow Chapters 6, 7 and 8 The 3rd World Demographic Transition The Green Revolution worked – Third World countries are able to feed a their population bending Malthus' rule (population increases exponentially while food increases arithmetically). Third World and developing nations traditionally have high infant mortality rates and no old age security system. – Children provide additional labor in family subsistence agriculture relieving the workload for all and don't cost much when you don't have to educate them. – Children provide for parents in their old age. Since many die young or fail to honor that obligation parents have large families as old age security (p. 228). Transitional Population increase. – As sanitation systems, disease eradication and prenatal care improve the survival rate of children improves. – There is a marked increase in population as more children survive creating new stresses on resources. Gradual decline in birthrates as society adapts to higher survival rate. National Investment in New Citizens (our children) • It costs a lot of money to prepare a child to fit into the American economy as a self-sufficient, average citizen-worker-consumer. – In the 1990s, Americans spend an average of $240,000. • $20,000 for housing, • $20,000 for food, • $100,000 public and private funding for an education, • $80,000 for plants and equipment to make her a productive worker, • And additional $20,000 for public infrastructure • At a population growth rate of 4% the United States would have to devote 40% of GNP to new citizen development • Developing countries cannot afford to make that sort of investment for their population leaving the poor and undereducated as a drag on the economy.
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2 Cost of Raising A Child: Dual Parent Family Before tax income: $39,100 to $65,800 170,460 18,960 17,430 12,180 10,470 24,510 29,550 57,360 Total 10,140 1,010 810 770 780 1,840 2,110 2,820 15 to 17 9,940 1,250 470 720 870 1,450 1,900 3,280 12 to 14 9,190 1,250 640 720 520 1,330 1,890 3,030 9 to 11 9,260 1,030 980 660 470 1,260 1,600 3,260 6 to 8 9,260 990 1,530 580 420 1,130 1,260 3,350 3 to 5 9,030 980 1,380 610 430 1,160 1,090 3,380 0 to 2 124,800 12,720 9,990 9,390 8,970 17,610 24,600 41,520 Total 7,480 660 400 600 660 1,440 1,780 1,940 15 to 17 7,560 900 240 560 750 1,070 1,640 2,400 12 to 14 6,730 720 340 560 450 950 1,560 2,150 9 to 11 6,710 680 560 510 400 880 1,300 2,380 6 to 8 6,630 680 820 440 360 750 1,010 2,470 3 to 5 6490 630 840 460 370 780 910 2,500 0 to 2 Total Child care/ Education Health Clothing Transportation Food Housing Age of Child http://www.sunlife-usa.com/tool/tl_5.cfm Population and Productivity Productivity and Economic Development – Japan's economic growth rate was 4% per annum while its population grew at a rate of 1.1% over the last century – The American economic growth rate was 3.3 while our population increased 1.5% per annum or 1.8% per capita growth rate. • The US has continued to invest in its educational system, particularly in
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course ISS 315 taught by Professor Hussain during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Thurow_12042007 - Thurow Chapters 6, 7 and 8 The 3rd World...

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