BB lecture 12-7 normal & cancerous cell division

BB lecture 12-7 normal & cancerous cell division -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Figure 12.18 Density-dependent inhibition and anchorage dependence of cell division 25 m Cells anchor to dish surface and divide ( anchorage dependence ). When cells have formed a complete single layer, they stop dividing ( density-dependent inhibition ). If some cells are scraped away, the remaining cells divide to fill the gap and then stop ( density-dependent inhibition ). Cancer cells do not exhibit anchorage dependence or density-dependent inhibition. 25 m Cancer cells. Cancer cells usually continue to divide well beyond a single layer, forming a clump of overlapping cells. Normal mammalian cells. The availability of nutrients, growth factors, and a substratum for attachment limits cell density to a single layer. (a) (b) Chapter 19 (pp370-374): Cancerous cells Learning objectives Distinguish between proto-oncogenes and oncogenes Know examples of how a proto-oncogene may change into an oncogene Explain how excessive cell division can result from mutations in the ras proto-oncogenes Discuss three ways p53 protein protects against mutations Describe the developmental stages of colorectal cancer in terms of genetic changes Explain how a virus can cause cancer Additional terms to know includeRas protein, ras oncogene, tumor-suppressor genes, p21 gene, hyperactive protein, multistep model of cancer development Types of Genes Associated with Cancer Genes that normally regulate the cell cycle such as those that code for growth factors, and/or the receptor proteins associated with growth factors, and also intracellular molecules of signaling pathways Mutations altering any of these genes can lead to cancer Oncogenes and Proto-Oncogenes Oncogenes are cancer-causing genes...
View Full Document

Page1 / 17

BB lecture 12-7 normal & cancerous cell division -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online