HalalProject.doc - The Halal Project Suggested Halal...

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The Halal Project: Suggested Halal Standards for the University of Toronto, St. George Campus Anti Racism and Cultural Diversity Office
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Anti Racism and Cultural Diversity Office Introduction Based on our observation of a lack of promoted Halal meat on campus, the Anti Racism and Cultural Diversity Office (to be referred to as the Office from here on) has initiated a “Halal Project”. This is a long term assignment, which will act as a both a proactive campaign, community building initiative and educational venture. In order to achieve the goal of visible and well-marketed Halal food on the St. George campus, the Office will consciously involve all stakeholders. These collaterals include Food Services Administration, Food Services Advisory Committee, food service providers, various Muslim student associations, and the general University of Toronto (U of T) community- administration, faculty, staff and students. It should be known that this docementl has been drafted mainly after the Canadian Government’s Agriculture and Agri-Food Department ( ), and the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) Halal Certification Agency ( ). We find these two sources to be extremely resourceful, and easily adaptable to the St. George campus and infrastructure. 1. What is Halal? In accordance with the Canadian Government’s Agriculture and Agri-Food Department, Halal food is prepared following a set of Islamic dietary laws and regulations that determine what is permissible, lawful and clean. Halal regulations are almost 1400 years old; traditionally, halal meat was always prepared and usually sold by Muslims. Halal foods were made from scratch at home and complex processed ingredients were not used. Today, Muslims continue to require food products that conform to acceptable halal standards. Permissible food categories include meat, poultry, fish, seafood, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Halal food is defined as safe and not harmfully prepared, it does not contain non-halal and najs (unclean) ingredients and is processed and manufactured using equipment that is not contaminated with things that are najs. Food items that are haram (prohibited) under Islamic dietary laws include: Swine Animals improperly slaughtered Alcohol and intoxicants Carnivorous animals, birds of prey and land animals without external ears Blood 2
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Anti Racism and Cultural Diversity Office Contaminated Foods Foods containing questionable ingredients
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