EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKEs LAW(3).pdf

EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKEs LAW(3).pdf - EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKES LAW 1...

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1 EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKE’S LAW 1. Objectives The main objective of this experiment is to show Hooke’s Law of spring, calculate the total energy absorbing in the spring. 2. Equipment Tripod Base Barrel Base Support Rod, square, l=1000mm Right Angle Clamp Cursor, 1 pair Weight Holder f. Slotted Weights Slotted Weight, 10g, black Slotted Weight, 10g, silver bronze Slotted Weight, 50g, black Slotted Weight, 50g, silver bronze Helical Spring 3 N/m Helical Spring 20 N/m Silk Thread, 200m Meter Scale demo l=1000mm Holding Pin Square section rubber strip, l 10m
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2 EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKE’S LAW Figure 4.1 Experimental set up
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3 EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKE’S LAW 3. Theory Measuring the stretching produced by different loads, added to the spring, tests the elasticity of a spring. When a spring is stretched by an applied force, a restoring force is produced. Due to the restoring force, simple harmonic motion is caused in a straight line in which the acceleration and the restoring force are directly proportional to the displacement of the vibrating load from the equilibrium position. The relation between the force ? and displacement 𝑥 is ? = −𝑘𝑥 . The force is opposite in direction to the displacement. The constant 𝑘 is known as the force constant of the spring. This is the force, expressed in Newton, which will produce an elongation of one meter in the spring. The equation of energy of the spring is shown below. 𝑑𝑊 = ?𝑑𝑥 (4.1) And if we integrate the Eq. 4.1 the equation of the potantial energy of the spring is shown below 𝑊 = ∆𝑃? = − 1 2 𝑘(𝑥 1 2 − 𝑥 0 2 ) (4.2) 4. Experimental Procedure and Calculations Figure 4.2 By adding the mass, the spring reaction
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4 EXPERIMENT 4 HOOKE’S LAW 1. Set up the spring as figure 4.2 2.Measure the length of each spring L thin = …………… . L thick = ……………… . 3. Hang a 𝑚 1 on first spring and record the elongation. 4. Repeat the step 3 for different masses.( 𝑚 2 , 𝑚 3 ) 5. Repeat the steps 4 and 5 for second spring.
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