1.13 Evaluating Student Responses.pdf

1.13 Evaluating Student Responses.pdf - A I think hes...

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Unformatted text preview: A.)​ ​I​ ​think​ ​he’s​ ​absolutely​ ​right​ ​in​ ​his​ ​argument.​ ​I​ ​think​ ​as​ ​a​ ​country,​ ​we​ ​should​ ​be​ ​a​ ​lot more​ ​supportive​ ​of​ ​those​ ​whose​ ​goal​ ​in​ ​life​ ​is​ ​to​ ​be​ ​studious​ ​and​ ​be​ ​as​ ​intelligent​ ​as possible,​ ​not​ ​to​ ​try​ ​and​ ​make​ ​sure​ ​they’re​ ​popular​ ​or​ ​athletic.​ ​The​ ​people​ ​being​ ​belittled and​ ​put​ ​down​ ​for​ ​being​ ​“nerds”​ ​are​ ​the​ ​people​ ​that​ ​will​ ​lead​ ​our​ ​country​ ​and​ ​proceed​ ​to improve​ ​society​ ​with​ ​their​ ​contributions,​ ​so​ ​I​ ​think​ ​we​ ​should​ ​have​ ​more​ ​respect. B.)​ ​The​ ​strength​ ​of​ ​the​ ​response​ ​2A​ ​was​ ​very​ ​well​ ​written.​ ​Whether​ ​it​ ​be​ ​the​ ​perfect transition​ ​from​ ​their​ ​details​ ​and​ ​opinion​ ​back​ ​to​ ​the​ ​information​ ​from​ ​the​ ​passage,​ ​they did​ ​a​ ​fantastic​ ​job​ ​of​ ​blending​ ​all​ ​details​ ​into​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​response,​ ​earning​ ​them​ ​a​ ​near perfect​ ​score.​ ​One​ ​weakness​ ​was​ ​that​ ​several​ ​words​ ​were​ ​misspelled,​ ​such​ ​as argument​ ​or​ ​“arguement”​ ​as​ ​written​ ​by​ ​the​ ​student,​ ​which​ ​prevents​ ​the​ ​reader​ ​from having​ ​an​ ​easy​ ​time​ ​reading​ ​the​ ​response.​ ​In​ ​response​ ​2B,​ ​the​ ​student​ ​does​ ​a​ ​good​ ​job of​ ​using​ ​plenty​ ​of​ ​information​ ​from​ ​the​ ​passage​ ​to​ ​enforce​ ​their​ ​point.​ ​The​ ​downside​ ​to this,​ ​is​ ​that​ ​they​ ​used​ ​nearly​ ​entirely​ ​excerpts​ ​and​ ​comments​ ​starting​ ​with​ ​“Fridman says”​ ​and​ ​sentences​ ​taken​ ​directly​ ​from​ ​the​ ​passage.​ ​With​ ​3​ ​whole​ ​pages​ ​of​ ​writing​ ​in this​ ​format,​ ​it’s​ ​bland,​ ​annoying,​ ​and​ ​repetitive,​ ​and​ ​loses​ ​the​ ​reader’s​ ​attention​ ​after they​ ​realize​ ​that​ ​all​ ​three​ ​paragraphs​ ​are​ ​identical​ ​in​ ​organization,​ ​and​ ​follow​ ​the​ ​same painful​ ​method​ ​of​ ​extracting​ ​information​ ​from​ ​the​ ​author’s​ ​writing.​ ​The​ ​student​ ​who wrote​ ​response​ ​3C​ ​was​ ​on​ ​the​ ​right​ ​track​ ​in​ ​my​ ​opinion.​ ​They​ ​had​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​of​ ​what​ ​they were​ ​supposed​ ​to​ ​write​ ​about​ ​they​ ​just​ ​did​ ​a​ ​very​ ​poor​ ​job​ ​of​ ​putting​ ​it​ ​into​ ​paper.​ ​They made​ ​statements​ ​about​ ​how​ ​“who​ ​one​ ​is”​ ​shouldn’t​ ​affect​ ​them​ ​because​ ​being​ ​called​ ​a nerd​ ​or​ ​geek​ ​shouldn’t​ ​be​ ​an​ ​insult,​ ​etc.​ ​This​ ​wasn’t​ ​a​ ​terrible​ ​main​ ​purpose​ ​of​ ​writing this,​ ​but​ ​the​ ​weakness​ ​in​ ​this​ ​article​ ​was​ ​of​ ​a​ ​much​ ​higher​ ​magnitude.​ ​First​ ​of​ ​all,​ ​they used​ ​several​ ​terms​ ​and​ ​words​ ​which​ ​didn’t​ ​have​ ​any​ ​sort​ ​of​ ​meaning​ ​in​ ​the​ ​context​ ​they were​ ​putting​ ​it​ ​in.​ ​One​ ​example​ ​is​ ​using​ ​the​ ​word​ stature,​ ​misspelled​ ​as​ ​“statur”,​ ​to describe​ ​a​ ​person’s​ ​personality​ ​traits,​ ​and​ ​another​ ​example​ ​is​ ​when​ ​they​ ​talked​ ​of calling​ ​a​ ​person​ ​with​ ​no​ ​popularity​ ​or​ ​not​ ​many​ ​qualities​ ​that​ ​would​ ​attract​ ​others​ ​to them​ ​a​ ​peasant,​ ​whereas​ ​it​ ​would​ ​be​ ​much​ ​better​ ​to​ ​use​ ​some​ ​vernacular​ ​that​ ​is​ ​more simple,​ ​like​ ​plebeian,​ ​or​ ​outcast,​ ​or​ ​literally​ ​anything​ ​that​ ​means​ ​the​ ​same​ ​thing​ ​but​ ​is actually​ ​a​ ​word​ ​that​ ​means​ ​that. C.)​ ​I​ ​think​ ​to​ ​create​ ​a​ ​solid​ ​argument​ ​in​ ​these​ ​types​ ​of​ ​prompts,​ ​you​ ​have​ ​to​ ​use​ ​both your​ ​outside​ ​intelligence​ ​on​ ​a​ ​topic​ ​and​ ​your​ ​personal​ ​experiences,​ ​along​ ​with​ ​the information​ ​in​ ​the​ ​passages​ ​given​ ​to​ ​you​ ​to​ ​give​ ​a​ ​well-rounded,​ ​above​ ​average​ ​free response.​ ​It​ ​gives​ ​your​ ​response​ ​an​ ​edge​ ​over​ ​the​ ​others​ ​because​ ​it​ ​has​ ​an​ ​undeniable depth​ ​compared​ ​to​ ​an​ ​individual​ ​who​ ​simply​ ​writes​ ​based​ ​off​ ​of​ ​the​ ​text. D.)​ ​The​ ​person​ ​who​ ​wrote​ ​2A​ ​brought​ ​in​ ​information​ ​about​ ​how​ ​Harvard​ ​had​ ​the​ ​first ever​ ​football​ ​team.​ ​An​ ​example​ ​of​ ​specific​ ​knowledge​ ​I​ ​could​ ​apply​ ​is​ ​how​ ​a​ ​study​ ​was published​ ​from​ ​Brock​ ​University​ ​in​ ​Ontario​ ​in​ ​2013​ ​about​ ​how​ ​those​ ​who​ ​possess​ ​racist, prejudist​ ​or​ ​even​ ​extremist​ ​qualities​ ​are​ ​those​ ​who​ ​while​ ​in​ ​the​ ​school​ ​system​ ​score lower​ ​on​ ​aptitude​ ​tests​ ​and​ ​other​ ​standardized​ ​testing​ ​forms.​ ​This​ ​information​ ​could​ ​tie in​ ​to​ ​show​ ​that​ ​we​ ​typically​ ​bully​ ​those​ ​who​ ​are​ ​studious​ ​just​ ​because​ ​we​ ​feel​ ​inferior​ ​to them.​ ​It​ ​could​ ​also​ ​be​ ​because​ ​it​ ​is​ ​seen​ ​as​ ​intimidation. ...
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