Hist17AFinalExamStudyGuide.docx

Hist17AFinalExamStudyGuide.docx - 1 Frederick Douglass An...

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1. Frederick Douglass: An American social reformer, orator , writer and statesman . After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writing. He stood as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves did not have the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens. Many Northerners also found it hard to believe that such a great orator had been a slave. 2. James k. Polk: 3. Paternalism: Is behavior, by a person, organization or state, which limits some person or group's liberty or autonomy for their own good. Paternalism can also imply that the behavior is against or regardless of the will of a person, or also that the behavior expresses an attitude of superiority. 4. Abolitionist: Social movement of the pre-Civil War era that advocated the immediate emancipation of the slaves and their incorporation into American society as equal citizens. 5. Missouri Compromise: Deal proposed by Kentucky senator Henry Clay in 1820 to resolve the slave/free imbalance in Congress that would result from Missouri’s admission as a slave state; Maine’s admission as free state offset Missouri, and slavery was prohibited in the remainder of the Louisiana Territory north of the southern border of Missouri. 6. Nat Turner's Revolt: Most important slave uprising in nineteenth-century America, led by a slave preacher who, with his followers, killed about sixty white persons in Southampton County, Virginia, in 1831. 7. Declaration of Sentiments: was an early and influential women's rights convention, the first to be organized by women in the Western world, in Seneca Falls, New York. It was planned by local New York women upon the occasion of a visit by Philadelphia-based Lucretia Mott, a Quaker famous for her oratorical ability, a skill rarely cultivated by American women at the time. The local women, primarily members of a radical Quaker group, organized the meeting along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a skeptical non-Quaker who followed logic more than religion. 8. Bleeding Kansas: Violence between pro-and antislavery settlers in the Kansas Territory, 1856 9. Scalawags: Southern republicans who supported republican policy through reconstruction.
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