Gas Wars Lab Report.docx - Name MahagonyKeen...

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            Name: Mahagony Keen Lab Partner: Halee Rellegrin                                    Date: 10/12/2015                         Section: 004                                                                                           TA Name: Nacaya  Gas Wars: Exploring Boyle’s Law & Charles’s Law I pledge that the work submitted for this lab report is my original work and is in accordance with the principles of academic integrity as defined in the statement on Academic Dishonesty in the UNO Student Code of Conduct. Signature: Mahagony Keen Date: 10/12/2017
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Purpose: To understand the interrelationships between temperature, pressure and volume of a gas. Introduction: A gas is a state of matter in which atoms or molecules are widely spaced and can spread out indefinitely. A gas has no definite shape nor volume. Pressure is defined as the measure of a force applied over a unit of area. The pressure that results from a gas is the result of gas particles colliding with its surrounding surface. Each time a gas particle collides with a surface a force is exerted. The sum of all these molecular collisions is pressure. The SI unit for pressure is pascal (Pa), Pressure= force/area= F/A. Volume is the measure of space that is taken up by matter. The volume of a gas is the amount of space occupied by the gas. The SI unit for volume is cubic meters, m 3 . Temperature is the measure of the amount of kinetic energy in matter. Kinetic energy is the energy due to motion. Therefore, temperature is a measure of molecular motion. The SI unit for temperature is kelvin (K). Formulas used in this experiment: F=ma; where m is mass & a is acceleration, Volume= A x H; where A is area & H is height, Area of a circle= πr 2, where r is radius. Gases have their own unique behavior depending on a variety of properties, such as temperature (T), pressure (P), volume (V) and amount in moles (n). These properties are interrelated when dealing with gases; a change in one of the properties can affect each of the other properties. Boyle’s Law and Charles’s Law describes the relationships between each of these properties. Boyle’s Law: the volume of a gas is inversely proportional to the pressure when the temperature and amount of gas (moles) is held constant. As volume increases, pressure decreases or as volume decreases, pressure will increase. Charles’s Law: the volume of a gas is proportional to its absolute temperature when the pressure and amount of gas is held constant.
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