mpatterson_05PRElab_103017.docx

mpatterson_05PRElab_103017.docx - Name Mariah Patterson...

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Name: Mariah Patterson Module 05 Lab Worksheet: Skeletal Muscle and Joint Dissection of the Cat Pre-Lab Evaluation Questions The pre-lab evaluation questions must be answered prior to lab and demonstrated to your lab instructor. You must read through the assigned chapter readings, lab introduction, objectives, overview and procedure to answer these questions. Please cite your work for any reference source you utilize in answering these questions. 1. Compare and contrast the three types of joints according to structural classification. Be sure to include the material binding the bones / structure together, the amount of movement of the joint and the typical locations of each. There are three types of joints when classified structurally. These are called fibrous joints, cartilaginous joints, and synovial joints. Fibrous joints connect bones utilizing fibrous tissue, these joints rarely move or do so slightly. Fibrous joints are often found in the bones of the forearm (radius and ulna) as well as the sutures of the skull (OpenStax, 2013). Cartilaginous joints join bones together by cartilage; hyaline cartilage makes up joints called synchondroses, fibrocartilage composes joints termed symphyses. The joints also enable very little movement. The pubic symphyses and the epiphyseal plates are notable examples of cartilaginous joints within the human body (Rasmussen College, 2017). The most common joints in the human body are the synovial joints. Unlike cartilaginous and fibrous joints, synovial joints possess a joint cavity, a fluid filled space that lies in between the articulating bones. This allows for increased movement within the joint depending upon the structure of the specific synovial joint (OpenStax, 2013).
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