ap-physics-course-description-2010.doc

ap-physics-course-description-2010.doc - OAKLAND TECHNICAL...

This preview shows page 1 out of 6 pages.

IMPORTANT STEPS IN LEARNING Through class activities , we introduce, reinforce, and practice new concepts. Through reading assignments , we learn the concepts more deeply. Through homework , we practice and apply the concepts. Through assessments , we show how well we know the concepts. OAKLAND TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL ADVANCED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Course Description & Syllabus AP Physics Mr. [email protected] Room S-1 The AP Physics course is a college-level course that uses advanced algebra, trigonometry, and calculus as the primary tools for solving problems. It is designed to provide a foundation in physics for students who will major in the physical sciences or engineering; it also provides a rigorous study of science for students who will pursue other majors. The goal of the course is to develop the student’s abilities to: Read, understand, and interpret physical information— verbally, mathematically, and graphically. Describe and explain the sequence of steps in the analysis of a particular physical phenomenon or problem by 1. Describing the idealized model to be used in the analysis, including simplifying assumptions where necessary, 2. Stating the principles or definitions that are applicable, 3. Specifying relevant limitations on the application of these principles, 4. Carrying out and describing the steps of the analysis—verbally or mathematically, and 5. Interpreting the results or conclusions, including discussion of particular cases of special interest. Use basic mathematical reasoning—algebra, geometry, trigonometry, or calculus, where appropriate—in a physical situation or problem. Perform experiments and interpret the results of observations, including making an assessment of experimental uncertainties. In keeping with the goals of Oakland Tech’s Engineering Academy, the course focuses on the topics in the AP Physics C – Mechanics exam, with the addition of waves, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism and relativity, as time permits. Prerequisites: One-year of Physics P or Physics HP; Pre-calculus; concurrent enrollment in Calculus, or permission of instructor. Textbooks: Primary text: Cutnell & Johnson, Physics , 7 th edition (Wiley, 2007); supplemental text: Halliday & Resnick, Fundamentals of Physics, 6 th edition (Wiley, 2000) AP Exams: There are separate Physics C Exams in Mechanics and Electricity/Magnetism; both are calculus-based. At Oakland Tech, the AP Physics course prepares students to take the Physics C – Mechanics exam. Calculator Policy: The exam consists of 35 multiple-choice problems that must be answered without using a calculator, and three free-response problems on which any kind of calculator may be used (but no QWERTY keyboards are allowed). The student will not be required to erase the calculator’s memory before or after the exam. Even so, the exam is designed and graded to minimize the need to do lengthy calculations. Tables containing commonly used physics equations are provided as part of the free-response section of the exam.
Image of page 1
You've reached the end of this preview.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern