01.195.135.01 - Intro to Short Fiction - Popovicova - FA10.doc

01.195.135.01 - Intro to Short Fiction - Popovicova - FA10.doc

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 6 pages.

INTRODUCTION TO SHORT FICTION Instructor: Iva Popovicova, PhD 01:195:135:01 MU 114 Tues/Thurs 2:50pm-4:10pm Office Hours: TUE 4:30-5:30pm Au Bon Pain (College Ave campus) THU: 4:45-5:45pm Brew-ha-ha’s (Douglass College campus) ________________________________________________________________ Learning Goals: SAS Liberal Arts Distribution Requirements: This course fulfills the Humanities requirement. New Core Curriculum Learning Goals (will become mandatory for Class of 2015) This course will meet the following goals: C: Arts and the Humanities (6 credits). Students must meet two goals. p. Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and in relation to specific histories, values, languages, cultures, and technologies. _________________________________________________________________ Required Texts and Reading: You are required to purchase the Norton Anthology of Short Fiction —Shorter Seventh Edition by Bausch and Cassill, Seventh Edition, Norton 2006. The book is available at Rutgers University Bookstore. In addition, there will be supplementary readings posted on SAKAI. Please print the readings and bring them to class. In this course, we will explore a wide variety of texts from several cultures and time periods with a particular focus on the body. While reading some of the greatest pieces of short fiction ever written, we will examine how the narrative style, diction, tone, setting, characters, and the representations of lived experiences inform our contemporary understandings of body politic. The purpose of this course is: to gain familiarity with a variety of world literatures as well as methods of studying literature and culture across national and linguistic boundaries and evaluate the nature, function and value of literature from a global perspective; to analyze a specific body of research and write a clear and well developed paper or project about a topic related to more than one literary and cultural tradition; to acquire appreciation for comparative literature while developing your critical thinking and writing skills; and to better understand the world around you. “I like the fiction writer’s feeling of being able to confront an experience and resolve it as art, however imperfectly and briefly – to give it a form and try to embody it – to hold it and express it in a story’s terms. You have more chance to try it in a novel. A short story is confined to one mood, to which everything in the story pertains. Characters, setting, time, events, are all subject to the mood. And you can try more ephemeral, more fleeting things in a story – you can work more by suggestion – than in a novel. Less is resolved, more is suggested, perhaps.” Eudora Welty in an interview with Linda Kuehl, Women Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews (Penguin, 1989), edited by George Plimpton. Introduction by Margaret Atwood. Reprinted from Writers 1
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

at Work: The Paris Review Interviews: Fourth Series and issue No. 55 of the Paris Review , Fall 1972 Course Requirements and Policies: Attendance and Participation: You are required to attend class having read the assigned material. Since we are going to engage in close reading, it is absolutely necessary that you have your books in front of you. Being
Image of page 2
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Spring '14
  • ArthurShearin

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern