lab6 - Petras/Falk1 Creating Soap and Biodiesel Fuel using...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Petras/Falk 1 Creating Soap and Biodiesel Fuel using Vegetable Oil and New Canola Oil Kaelyn Petras Daniel Falk LBS171L Section 008 TA: Merideth Lindeman Fitzpatrick
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Petras/Falk 2 December 6, 2006 Abstract:  Two different oils were used to create soap and biodiesel fuel.  Both  experiments were successful.   By heating and cooling, soap and biodiesel fuel was  created and was tested to confirm the results.  By getting a negative Q value after  burning the fuel, this proves that biodiesel was actually created and was completely  used up in the heating process. The water in the pop can absorbed the energy burned  off by the fuel. Introduction - When creating soap, saponification is used.  This is a method of making  soap which does not require an outside heat source.  For this reason, this process is  often used by soapers, or home soapmakers. Lye, either sodium hydroxide or  potassium hydroxide, is mixed with an appropriate amount of fats and/or oils to start  the saponification process that leads to soap.  Once the lye solution has cooled to  approximately the same temperature as the oils, the two are combined and stirred. A  stick blender is often used to speed this process. The two thin, clear substances  become cloudy and begin to thicken. Soapmakers refer to the thickening process as  "tracing". Often, tracing can occur very suddenly: after many minutes of stirring, the  mixture can turn to the consistency of pudding in a matter of seconds.  Biodiesel refers  to a diesel-equivalent, processed fuel derived from biological sources. Though derived  from biological sources, it is a processed fuel that can be readily used in diesel- engined vehicles, which distinguishes biodiesel from the straight vegetable oils (SVO)  or waste vegetable oils (WVO) used as fuels in some modified diesel vehicles.  Biodiesel is a light to dark yellow liquid. It is practically immiscible with water, has a  high boiling point and low vapor pressure. Typical methyl ester biodiesel has a flash  point of ~ 150 °C (300 °F), making it rather non-flammable. Biodiesel has a density of  ~ 0.86 g/cm³, less than that of water. Biodiesel uncontaminated with starting material  can be regarded as non-toxic. Biodiesel has a viscosity similar to petrodiesel, the  industry term for diesel produced from petroleum. It can be used as an additive in 
Background image of page 2
Petras/Falk 3 formulations of diesel to increase the lubricity of pure Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD)  fuel, although care must be taken to ensure that the biodiesel used does not increase  the sulfur content of the mixture above 15 ppm.  Biodiesel production is the process of 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

lab6 - Petras/Falk1 Creating Soap and Biodiesel Fuel using...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online