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Running head: WK 2 MAIN DISCUSSIONWk 2 Main DiscussionEpidemiology: The Basis for Public HealthWalden UniversityNURS 4211 - Role of the Nurse Leadership in Population HealthDr. Nancy KellyAugust 30, 20171
WK 2 MAIN DISCUSSIONWk 2 Main DiscussionTuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection that continues to plague both the United States (U.S.) and the world abroad. TB, caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosisorganism and usually found in the lungs or throat, is transmitted through the air when the infected person coughs, sneezes, speaks or sings in the presence of other people (CDC, n.d.). Although TB entersthe body through inhalation, once in the lungs, the bacteria begin to multiply and can enter the blood stream, spreading throughout the body to other areas such as the brain, spine, and kidneys (CDC, n.d.). Subsequently, because there is less of a risk of transmission from these areas, TB found in parts of the body outside of the lungs and throat are not considered to be infectious (CDC, n.d.)However, for those with TB found in the body, two forms of TB exist: latent TB infectionand active TB disease (CDC, n.d.). Latent TB infection, as with many infections, occurs when the individual who inhales the bacteria, has an immune response which is able to prevent the growth of the bacteria and subsequent symptoms of illness, thus inactivating the disease and its ability to spread (CDC, n.d.). Although still “infected”, they are not considered contagious (CDC, n.d.). The latter of the two, and the primary focus of this discussion, becomes active TB disease when the body fails to defend itself from the invasion and the individual becomes ill and also contagious, becoming a primary threat to the health those with whom they come in close contact (CDC, n.d.). As with many diseases, the exposure and devastation related to Tuberculosis is far

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