Research project cultural communication-quintoriagibson.docx - Benchmark Cultural Communication Values and Intercultural Communication Challenges

Research project cultural...

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Benchmark: Cultural Communication Values and Intercultural Communication Challenges Communication Values and Intercultural Communication Challenges Quintoria Gibson Grand Canyon University: COM-263 22 September 2017 1
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Cultural Values and Communication Challenges Rough Draft In the Disney animated movie, Pocahontas, it explains cultural conflict perfectly by examining the relationship between the young native girl and her love for an English settler. Both Pocahontas’ father and John Smith’s captain disapproved of their relationship and freely express stereotypes of each other. This example just shows how different cultures are and how they automatically create a conflict before taking the time to know each other. One culture that gets discriminated a lot is the Hispanic culture. When communicating with the Hispanic culture, intercultural communication can be confronted by stereotyping, discrimination, ethnocentrism and prejudgment. Stereotype and Ethnocentrism The concepts of stereotyping and ethnocentrism happen when another culture is presented to someone different from them and they make pre judgments of that culture. Stereotyping and ethnocentrism are two factors of intercultural communication that are similar and cause many multicultural conflicts between each other. Stereotype The concept of stereotypes comes from people’s responses to external reality, instead, people answer to a representation of the outside world by perception and cognition (Ashmore & Del Boca, 1981). This means that stereotypes primarily come from outside perspectives and what they initially see. An couple examples of stereotyping a race would be implying that all Hispanics are poor, or that all Hispanics have a big family with 5 kids and 30 cousins. Ethnocentrism Ethnocentrism was conceptualized as an impression that distinguished in-groups from outgroups, or one’s culture from one a different one (Shimp, 1984). People who are ethnocentric believe that their race or culture has more power, authority and matters most than other cultures 2
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