Lab_Report

Lab_Report - SWH Format—Detailed Explanation Beginning...

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Unformatted text preview: SWH Format—Detailed Explanation Beginning Questions. What will I do? A prewlaboratory discussion helps to define beginning questions to investigate experimentally. After reading the laboratory material, write a question or two that can be answered by doing the experiment. Often the questions are in the form of a quantitative relationship. Sometimes the questions are qualitative in nature. Acceptable examples are: How does the length of the non—polar region of a molecule relate to the equilibrium constant? How does the reaction demonstrate equilibrium? How does the amount of compound dissolved in water affect AHm? Unacceptable examples are: What is the limiting reagent? What color is my product? “Why” questions cannot be answered by doing the lab experiment and are considered nonproductive. For example: Why are there buffers? Why do we use a burette? Questions regarding procedure are not useful. (An example would be: How do I setup a vacuum filtration apparatus?) Most of the time, students will need to share data in order to answer a question that has a relationship. For example: How does the amount of the limiting reagent affect the percent yield? Even though a question may seem obvious, it is important to ask that question, make a claim about it, and then back up the claim with evidence. Safety. How will I stay safe? After reading the laboratory, list the major safety concerns for the experiment you are about to do. This is separate from the web-based safety assignments. Additions can be made to your safety section during the pre—lab lecture. For example, some safety considerations include: using gloves when appropriate, using the fume hood when producing a toxic gas, and appropriate disposal of waste products. Tests] Procedure. What tests will I conduct or what procedure will I follow? After reading the lab, list the steps that you will take to perform the laboratory experiment. Remember, the entire class will work on this project. How will you divide the labor? l l l l l l E z t § t: t You may have multiple sections. You may reference the lab manual, but keep in mind that a list of the major procedural steps may be useful on the lab practical, the laboratory “exam” that you will take in this course. What would you want to include if someone were going to use only your procedure to do the lab? Data/Observations, Graphs, Balanced Equations, and Calculations. What information will I gather? During the lab, list all data, complete observations, notes, calculations, equations, chemical information etc. in your lab notebook. Do not use another notebook or scratch sheets of paper. You can use your laboratory notebook during the lab practical exams. Claims. What can I claim? This is to be a one— or two-sentence statement about the results of your laboratory work. For example: If the concentration of reagent A doubles, so does the rate of the reaction. An inappropriate claim would be: My product weighed 2.3 grams- Evidence. How do I know? Why ant I making these claims? This is a written explanation that supports your claims. How do you know that the rate of the reaction increases as the concentration increases? Include time vs. concentration data. Explain the meaning behind the data and calculations. Graphs, balanced equations, and calculations need to be interpreted and explained in order to count as evidence. Simply referring to them is not enough. Appropriate balanced chemical equations and necessary mathematical calculations can be used to support your claims, but the emphasis is on the interpretation and explanation of these results. Reading/Reflection. How have my ideas changed? Discuss your initial question. Have your ideas changed? Do you have a new question? How do your results compare to other groups or the textbook or literature value? What connections did you make between the lab and lecture? i i r r r t t r t i GENERAL CHEMESTRY (CHEM 151) CHEMISTR YXXI PROJECT LAB REPORT GRADING RUBRIC l. Beginning Question(s) What question(s) did I have? What question(s) did the class group decide to use? 2 pts. The student provided her own relevant beginning question(s) as well as the beginning question(s) selected by her group or the class. 1 pt. The student provided either her Own beginning c;uestion(s) or the class beginning question(s) but not both. 0 ts. The student provided no beginning uestionCs) or a be innin question that was not relevant. What general point(s) can 1 make about staying safe in this experiment? What more specific point(s) should i make about a certain chemical or procedure? 2. Safety Considerations 2 pts. The student provided both a relevant general safety statement as well as a more specific concern about a particular substance or procedure. 1 pt. The student provided either general safety concerns or a specific concern, but not both. 0 pts. The student provided no discussion about safety concerns or made a statement that was not relevant. What did 1 actually do (in outline form, specific enough for someone else to follow) to perform this experiment? 3. Procedures 2 pts. The procedure is complete, logical, and the instructor can read and follow it. 1 pt. Steps of the procedure are missing but the instructor can still make a sense of it. 0 pts. The procedure is missing or does not make sense as written. What qualitative observations did i make? What quantitative data have I collected, and what 4 Data, calculations did i do to make sense of my data? What balanced equations have 1 written? Havel Observations, prepared a properly labeled and titled graph? Calculations’ 6 pts. The student provided all of the following: and Graphs :1 Relevant and complete qualitative observations; Relevant and complete quantitative data; b. c. Relevant and complete calculations; d. e. Relevant and complete balanced equation(s) when appropriate; A properly labeled, drafted, and titled graph that correctly reflects the data collected when appropriate. 5 pts. The student provided all but one of the five components listed above or one of the parts was not complete or correct. 4 pts. The student provided all but two of the five components listed above or two of the parts were not complete or correct. 3 pts. The student provided all but three of the five components listed above or three of the parts were not complete or correct. 2 pts. The student provided only one of the five components listed above or four of the parts were not complete or correct. l pt. The student made a weait attempt to provide some of the information but it was poorly done or incomplete enough to receive only one point. 0 pts. The student provided no qualitative observations, no quantitative data, no calculations, no balanced euations (where relevant), and no roerl labeled and drafted erah. What can 1 claim to answer my beginning question(s) or the class beginning questionts)? 2 pts. The student provided her own relevant Claim to answer either her own or the class beginning question(s). 1 pt. The student does not provide a relevant claim to answer either her own or the class beginning question(s). 0 ts. The student rovides no claim at all. GENERAL CHEMtSTRY (CHEM 15:) CHEMISTRYXX’I PROJECT LAB REPORT GRADING RUBRIC 6. Evidence and Anaiysis What is my interpretation of my data (graphs, class data, trends, or other anaEysis to support my c}aim(s)? Have 3 connected the proper evidence with the proper claim? 6 pts. The student does an excellent job of providing her own relevant interpretation of the data (graphs, class data, trends, or other analysis to support the claim(s and connected the proper evidence ‘ with the proper claim. 4 pts. The student does an average job of providing her own relevant interpretation of the data (graphs, class data, trends, or other analysis to support the ciaim(s and connected the proper evidenCC with the proper claim. 2 pts. The student does a poor job of providing her own relevant interpretation of the data (graphs, class data, trends, or other analysis to support the ciaim(s and connected the proper evidence with the proper claim. 0 ts. The student rovides no inte retation of the data. a. Havel identified and explained sources of error and assumptions made during the experiment? b. How have my ideas changed, what new questions do ] have, or what new things do I have to think about? c. How does this work tie into concepts about which] have learned in class? d. To what can 1 refer in my text, my notes, or some real life application to maite a connection with this laboratory work? e. What are my answers to any post—lab questions? How do I incorporate them into my report? 7. Reading, Reflection, and Post—Laboratory Questions 10 pts. The student does an excellent job of a) Identifying and expiaining sources of error and assumptions made during the experiment; b) Explaining how her ideas have changed, and what new questions she has, or what new things she has to think about after doing the Lab; c} Explaining how this work ties into concepts that have been learned in class; d) Referring to the text, class notes, or some real life application to make a connection with this laboratory work; e) Answering post-lab questions and incorporating them into the report. . The student does a good job of each of the points a-e. . The student does an average job of each of the points a—e. . The student does a poor job of each of the points a-e. . The student vaguely mentions one or two of points a-e. . The student does not mention an of the oints a-e. ...
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Lab_Report - SWH Format—Detailed Explanation Beginning...

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