Lecture Notes (1) - Lecture 2 2008-09-03 Topics: 1. Sources...

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Lecture 2 19:04 Topics:     1. Sources of Law 2. Civil and Criminal Cases Sources of Law     Five Sources of Law     U.S. Constitution Statutes Administrative Regulations Common Law Court Orders U.S. Constitution More important than other sources of law No other source of law can conflict with constitutional ideas. Constitutional Power:     o Legislative Power  – The authority to take ideas and create laws from  them. Congress House of Representatives (435)
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Senate (100) o Executive Power  – The legal authority to enforce the laws that exist. o Judicial Power  – The authority to determine what laws mean. Many laws are vague and unclear Allows for increased power of laws (how the court determines them.)  The Final word. Statues If statue gets enough support, it becomes a real law. o 3 Part Approval:     1. Idea is passed by a majority vote in the House. 2. Idea is passed by a majority vote in the Senate. 3. Idea is passed by the President. Checks and Balances     President’s Power over Congress o Veto Congress’ Power over the President o Override President’s Veto (Requires 2/3rds of Congress) o Impeachment (Requires majority vote from House)   (Requires 2/3  majority vote from Senate) President’s Power over the Supreme Court o Can nominate replacement justice for the Supreme Court
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The Supreme Court Power over the President o Can Ignore the President (cannot be bullied or pushed into anything) Senate Power over the Supreme Court o “Confirmation” Power over President’s Supreme Court nomination o Amend the Constitution The Supreme Court Power over Congress o Judicial Review – Gets final word on whether the statue will be allowed Administrative Regulations Government agencies given the power to create their own rules/laws (IRS,  EPA, etc.) Rules/Laws = Administrative regulations Common Law Following past court decisions (based on previous cases) Court Orders Requirements courts place on individuals or companies Civil and Criminal Cases     Civil Cases
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o Suits between private individuals, groups, or businesses Criminal Cases o The government goes against a wrongdoer of violating a criminal law o Seek to punish somebody for violating a criminal law Plaintiff  – A person who is suing somebody else (injury, loss, money) Defendant  – Accused of wrongdoing Civil:      Types of Punishments: Cash Damages - Awarded Money (From defendant to plaintiff) Injunction  – Court order to stop doing something Specific Performance  – Court order to do something Criminal: Types of Punishments
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Lecture Notes (1) - Lecture 2 2008-09-03 Topics: 1. Sources...

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