2nd Test Marketing Notes

2nd Test Marketing - 2nd Test Marketing Notes Perception Determines what Consumer see and feel There is selective exposure selective perception and

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2nd Test Marketing Notes Perception Determines what Consumer see and feel There is selective exposure, selective perception, and selective retention. Selective Exposure is when customers are very selective in seeking out only products which interest them. Selective Perception is when customers screen out or modify messages or information that conflict with previously learned ideals. Selective Retention means a consumer only remembers what they really want to remember. Learning determines what response is likely. There are three main ideals: Drive, cues, and response. There was some talk about Michelin tires in class. The teacher really likes them and the perception there is that people think of them as really good tires. Learning is a process of picking things up from past experiences. Response is an effort to satisfy a drive. Cues are the stimuli which cause some kind of response. Attitudes Relate to Buying There are 6 key concepts. Belief: An opinion Need to understand attitudes and beliefs Work with existing attitudes Ethical issues may arise Meeting expectations is important Attitude: A point of view So, attitude is extremely important to consumer’s consumption choices. Personality and Lifestyle Analysis
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/22/2009 for the course MKT 320F taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 3

2nd Test Marketing - 2nd Test Marketing Notes Perception Determines what Consumer see and feel There is selective exposure selective perception and

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online