James Franco Study Guide .pdf

James Franco Study Guide .pdf - Monday ENGL-074 Recommended...

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Monday, April 25, 2016 ENGL-074 Recommended By James Franco Study Guide Invisible Man I. Key information: A. Author: Ralph Ellison B. Year: 1952 C. Characters: 1. The Narrator : Nameless, the “invisible man,” African- American, college student —>the Brotherhood—> living underground 2. Brother Jack —White & loyal leader of the Brotherhood, glass eye/red hair= blindness and communism 3. Tod Clifton —Black brotherhood member, sells Sambo dolls on the street 4. Ras the Exhorter —Angry man who represents the black nationalist movement, possible symbol for Marcus Garvey 5. Rinehart —surreal figure who doesn’t ever appear, symbolized the examination of identity and self-conception 6. Dr. Bledsoe— President of the college, driven by power and status, screws Invisible Man 7. Mr. Norton —Wealthy, white trustee who Invisible Man drives around 8. Reverend Homer A. Barbee — Chicago preacher who impregnated his own daughter, story somehow gains sympathy when its told to Mr. Norton 9. Mary —Motherly black woman who Invisible Man stays with for free, he breaks her picture II. Prologue: A. Beats the shit out of a white guys B. Potential anger and violence C. Confirms the white guy’s vision of black people 1. Literal madness D. Problematic nature of not being seen III. Chapter 1: A. Grandfather —last words: “learn it to the young’ns” 1. Undermine the whites with “yeses and grins” B. Battle royal metaphor—boxing match f 1. Naked blonde woman with American flag on her stomach parades around and is attacked by men 2. Loses in the finals, boys lunge for thrown money, electrical current in the rugs shocks them C. Gifted the briefcase —a scholarship to the state college for black youth D. Dreams of his grandfather and receiving a letter in the briefcase, “to whom it may concern… keep this n***-boy running.” E. Establishes race relations, foreshadows the rest of the novel 1
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Monday, April 25, 2016 IV. Chapter 2: A. The statue of the Founder: a black man, cold, paternal, empty eyes B. Takes a job driving a wealthy,white, founder: Mr. Norton C. Goes to see Jim Trueblood—> makes Norton recount his own daughter impregnated his daughter—>TB somehow received sympathy—>Norton finds the story intriguing, and is shocked that Trueblood could get away with it— almost a twinge of jealousy—>pays him $100 V. Chapter 3: A. Golden Day Bar—Norton “might die”—in the “slaves quarters” of town B. Norton falls unconscious when a group of “vets” get into a fight C. One “vet,” a doctor,” calls the narrator a man stricken with blindness 1. Norton gets angry and demands the narrator take him back VI. Chapters 4-6 A. 4—Norton requests Dr. Bledsoe and Bledsoe gets angry at the Narrator 1. Narrator called to meet with Bledsoe, but its Norton 2. Norton claims that he told Bledsoe that it wasn’t the narrators fault B. 5—Reverend Homer Barbee speaks at the chapel 1. Was a slave and escaped north, came back and founded the college 2. He is blind, much like Homer the poet C.
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