L03 ASSIGNMENT.docx - Running head L03 ASSIGNMENT 1 L03 Assignment Adriana Renteria CAS100C Effective Speech September 10th 2017 Elizabeth Mills L03

L03 ASSIGNMENT.docx - Running head L03 ASSIGNMENT 1 L03...

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Running head: L03 ASSIGNMENT 1 L03 Assignment Adriana Renteria CAS100C: Effective Speech September 10th, 2017 Elizabeth Mills
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L03 ASSIGNMENT 2 L03 Assignment On April 4, 1968, Robert F. Kennedy was on the campaign trail seeking the 1968 Democratic presidential nomination. While on his flight to Indianapolis, where he was scheduled to give his next campaign speech that evening, RFK was informed of the very unfortunate events that had taken place in Memphis, Tennessee that very same evening: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had been assassinated. As a result, the emotions of citizens across the country were running very high, especially amongst African-Americans. Many major cities were in turmoil once the news began to spread. Despite warnings of a possible riot, Kennedy decided to go forward with his speech. On the back of flatbed truck, RFK would address his audience comprised mostly of blacks in the heart of their poor neighborhood and make the announcement of Dr. King’s death. Despite the small window of time Kennedy had to prepare, he focused in on the characteristics of his audience. By thoughtfully considering the demographics, culture, and psychology of those who would attend his speech, Kennedy was able to accomplish an extraordinary feat and prevent what almost seemed like inevitable, racially-charged uproar. Knowing that the news of Dr. King’s murder would likely elicit an angry and powerful response from the crowd, Kennedy was faced with the difficult challenge of diffusing negative emotions and creating a sense of unity. In an age where information was not as instantaneous as it is today, a majority of the audience members were not yet aware of Dr. King’s death. For the few that were aware, the time spent waiting for the crowd to assemble for RFK’s speech simultaneously served to formulate even stronger feelings of anger and resentment toward whites (Warrenburg, 2009). Kennedy effectively acknowledged these feelings in his speech and
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