Lec4Heredity2Sp09

Lec4Heredity2Sp09 - Lecture 4 (1/29/09) What is inherited?...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 4 (1/29/09) What is inherited? part 2 The question “what is inherited?” can be answered in two ways: In terms of the particular DNA strand, gene expression processes and resulting proteins, with attention to the factors that influence gene expression Or, in terms of functions or traits that are linked to the protein, such as emotional response, temperament or cognitive capacity, and the degree to which these traits can be influenced by experience An “instinct” is an example of a trait that has a relatively fixed behavioral form that remains little influenced by experience A “predisposition” is an example of a trait that has no clear behavioral form and whose influence varies as a function of experience and setting These differences are important in terms of our understanding the motives behind behavior and in terms of social policy
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Instincts vs. predispositions Instincts are unlearned, inherited behavioral reactions to certain kinds of stimuli. They are hard-wired and ready to use, but do depend on maturational processes to appear. A genetic predisposition influences features of an organism that are also influenced by experience. Hence, the influence of the genetic predisposition varies with experience and setting. It is also possible for the predisposition itself to be influenced by experience, as when maternal care leads to life-long changes in the response to stressors.
Background image of page 2
These ideas will be illustrated with 3 case studies Imprinting The smile Alcoholism
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Imprinting A behavioral pattern that is established early in life and once in place is resistant to change Filial imprinting: the following response in “precocial” animals. E.g., ducks follow the first reasonably sized object that moves ---and continue to do so regardless of what it is sexual imprinting: the willingness to mate only with the initially imprinted creature
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The “its cute” instinct (maybe)
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

Lec4Heredity2Sp09 - Lecture 4 (1/29/09) What is inherited?...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online