Lec10Learning2 - Lecture 10 (2/24/09): Classical...

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Lecture 10 (2/24/09): Classical conditioning’s domain (and limitations) Examples of classical conditioning Parameters of classical conditioning But does classical conditioning really provide a complete account of phobias?
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iClicker According to the text, to the extinction of learned associations occurs because of A = passage of time B = presenting the unconditioned stimulus without the conditioned stimulus C = presenting the conditioned stimulus without the unconditioned stimulus D = all of the above C is correct…. .
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iClicker According to text classical conditioning: A = always requires that an unconditioned stimulus is present B = can occur without an unconditioned stimulus present C = can occur without an unconditioned stimulus present depending on individual differences (e.g., differences in susceptibility to conditioning). D = can occur without an unconditioned stimulus present in humans but not in rats or monkeys B is correct, see text on 2 nd order conditioning and lecture on “evaluative conditioning.”
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Some examples of classical conditioning Preferences in rats for cues that predict shock Advertizing Drug effects
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Would you prefer a surprising or predictable inescapable aversive event? Rats reliably prefer predictable unavoidable shocks. They do so even if they cannot adjust posture in any obvious way to mitigate shock. Why the preference?
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(shock) relative to one that was unpredictable. 1. Seems surprising, since shouldn’t the signal become a conditioned stimulus, and hence fear evoking? 2. Perhaps the experimental subjects learned to brace themselves, thereby reducing intensity of shock? 3. But when no physical adjustments appeared possible, rats still preferred signaled to unsignaled shock . 4. Hypothesis:
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Lec10Learning2 - Lecture 10 (2/24/09): Classical...

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