Social Justice Project Tips.docx

Social Justice Project Tips.docx - Social Justice Project...

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Social Justice Project Tips 1. Choose a project based on your child’s interests and talents The first step is to help your child choose something that he is good at and enjoys doing. Here are a few ideas for different types of learners and matching them with service learning and social justice projects based on Howard Gardner’s model of multiple intelligence: 1. Linguistic learners like to read, write, and tell stories. They learn by hearing and seeing words, know unusual amounts of information, have advanced vocabularies, memorize facts verbatim. Offer to read or write letters for young kids, the elderly, or people with disabilities.Start a letter-writing campaign about an issue that concerns you.Become a pen pal with an orphan overseas or a patient at a nearby hospital.Donate used books to a library, homeless shelter, or classroom. 2. Bodily/kinesthetic learners handle their bodies with ease and poise for their age, are adept at using their body for sports or artistic expression, and are skilled in fine motor tasks.Help coach younger children in dancing, gymnastics, a favorite sport, or acting.Volunteer for the Special Olympics or help students with disabilities at a local school.Make or repair dolls and other toys for needy or sick kids.Mend clothes or sew blankets for a shelter. 3. Intrapersonal learners have strong self-understanding, are original, enjoy working alone to pursue their own interests and goals, and have a strong sense of right and wrong.“Adopt” someone who could use a friend, such as an elderly person; offer to call periodically. Teach a special hobby—magic, juggling, art, drumming, calligraphy—to needy kids.Ask permission to start a food drive at your parents’ workplace or in your community. 4. Interpersonal learners understand people, lead and organize others, have lots of friends, are looked to by others to make decisions and mediate conflicts, and enjoy joining groups.Start a club and make after-school snacks for homeless kids or soup for a shelter.Put together a walk-a-thon or read-a-thon and donate the proceeds to a local charity.Go door-to-door with a parent and friends collecting warm clothes
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