OANtOF_ZaneAllred - Zane Allred 2nd Beth-lehem Moab and a Northern England Village Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit as the antithesis to Ruth The

OANtOF_ZaneAllred - Zane Allred 2nd Beth-lehem Moab...

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Zane Allred 2n d Beth-lehem, Moab, and a Northern England Village: Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit as the antithesis to Ruth The last chapter of Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson is titled Ruth, after the bible chapter; in this we find our main character Jeanette visiting her adoptive mother after an unknown period of time having been a runaway, seemingly not being able to let go this mutually infectious relationship. Every chapter of this book is titled synonymously with one in the bible and all can reveal something new, however, Ruth in particular gives away a deeper understanding of the story that Winterson uses to critique aspects of organized religion as a whole. To understand how Winterson does this we need to take a brief look at Ruth. In Ruth , a young Moabitess (one who lived in the city of Moab), Ruth, chooses to move to Bethlehem with her mother-in- law after both had been widowed, and eventually marries a rich man related to her “mother” after serving in his fields for a short time. The story is meant to show a bit about the time’s way of doing things, and to teach reader’s to uphold the values of Ruth who is selfless, truthful, and brave in her love. This is highly similar to our other main character, Jeanette, who spends much of the early book trying to warn her peers of sin and ends up in the office after “hav[ing] been talking about Hell to young minds”(page 44) which shows her own selflessness. We also see many signs of her truthfulness, in telling her Mother of her feelings for Melanie, in proclaiming it in front of the entire congregation, “I love her. ‘Then you do not love the Lord.’ Yes, I love both of them.”(page 105.) And of course, Jeanette can also be seen as being brave in her love through that same quotation, and in eventually running from home when her love and sexuality is further persecuted. Through all of this we can draw many direct parallels between Ruth and

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