Chinese Theatre.docx - RUNNING HEAD CHINESE THEATRE 1 Isabella Cox Chinese Theatre Inro to Theatre 2140G CHINESE THEATRE 2 Chinese Theatre There are

Chinese Theatre.docx - RUNNING HEAD CHINESE THEATRE 1...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 7 pages.

RUNNING HEAD: CHINESE THEATRE 1 Isabella Cox Chinese Theatre Inro to Theatre 2140G
CHINESE THEATRE 2 Chinese Theatre There are very many interesting and very different aspects to Chinese Theatre. For example, Chines theatre includes complex makeup, elaborate costumes and there is always some kind of music or singing involved. These pieces set Chinese Theatre apart from most other kinds of theatre one would see in The United States. Another aspect that is unique to Chinese theatre are the extravagant acrobatic routines. According to Colin Mackerras (1983) the editor of Chinese Theatre: From Its Origins to the Present Day , “[a]crobatics were to be found on the Chinese stage as early as the Han dynasty, before the birth of Christ, and have retained their popularity all the way to the present” (p. 2). Chinese Theatre has been used in many ways by different dynasties. Almost all Chinese governments have censored and controlled the theatres. Communists used the theatres as a way of propaganda, to persuade people to their social program by putting on performances that would lead the audience to identify “with the Communist heroes…, and to reject as bad those among the Communists’ opponents whom the drama was portraying as negative” [Col83]. Chinese Theatre has many different unique aspects of its live theatre productions. One early type and unique style of live Chinese Theatre was Shamanism. A shaman could be defined “as a priest or other intermediary recognized as possessing special powers…” these people used their powers to call upon and communicate with spirits and different gods [Col83]. Shamanism is one of the earliest types of Chinese theatres that involved rituals of dancing, singing and costumes. The Chinese shamans more than likely used dancing and singing in their productions to call upon spirits, and this was probably used to entertain the audience. Some songs “distinctly mirror a performance and imply some form of acting, with gestures, musical accompaniment and special costumes.” It is possible that overtime songs began to change. However, they did still contain some elements of shamanism the songs were “… not originally from the same cycle…” they were later edited to please a Chu court that preferred performances of religious operas. [Col83]. Shamanism is one of the earliest types of live theatre that used singing to entertain its audience. Song is a big part of Chinese theatre, but it is also a big part of how an actor expresses himself. The way an actor is about to begin to sing is very specific. The actor will indicate he is ready to begin signing to the orchestra in many ways. For example, according to A. C. Scott
CHINESE THEATRE 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture