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Torture and Ethics 1 Torture and Ethics Paper Name Class Date Professor
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Torture and Ethics 2 Torture and Ethics Paper Torture is the use of violence and pain to ensure a victim complies. Torture is inhumane and there are never circumstances were this action is right. Torture violates human rights and is in fact illegal under international law. Because torture is considered to be a heinous and inhumane one of the first duties of the United Nations was to create human rights standards. These standards include the members of the United Nations, including America, adhering to a standard of humanity that does not allow for acts such as torture. International law prohibits torture and any other form of inhuman and degrading treatment of the human being. Despite the fact that torture has been banned by international law this practice is still common in the world. Militaries torture prisoners for information or in order to inflict punishment for some perceived harm. Torture is not justice and it violates not only the right of the individual being tortured but humanity. Moral and just people do not torture others for any reason. Torture can be physical or it can be mental but the sole goal is to inflict pain. Torture can include beatings, whippings, sexual abuse and rape, electrocution, drowning, hanging, suffocation, and mutilations as well as extreme isolation, long hours of staying awake or standing, threats against family and hard labor. Torture is cruel and unusual punishment and has never been supported in American society and in fact American laws have always been designed to ensure this treatment does not occur as well has been a strong supporter of international efforts such as the Geneva Convention. The United States has always prohibited the use of torture in our Constitution, laws executive statements and judicial decisions (Cohn, 2008). Military field manuals expressly forbid acts of
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Torture and Ethics 3 torture and military personnel found guilty of this behavior will be subject to Uniform Code of Military Justice. Despite all of these protections against torture after 9/11 America’s policy, under the Bush Administration, began to change. In the case of Filartiga v. Peña-Irala in 1980 the Second Circuit Court ruled that the prohibition against torture is universal, obligatory, specific and definable (Con, 2008). Since this case the wrongness of torture has been reaffirmed through other cases and legislation. Despite this fact in 2002 Bush declared that the Geneva Convention did not
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