EDEE230_FlexibleInterview_AssignmentDescription_Fall2015_FNL (1).pdf

EDEE230_FlexibleInterview_AssignmentDescription_Fall2015_FNL (1).pdf

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Unformatted text preview: EDEE 230 Assignment: Flexible Interview of Child Focused on Fractions Due date for this assignment will depend on your section. See syllabus for details. Investigating your students' understanding is an important part of preparing to teach. Although it may not always be possible that you (or any teacher) can do extensive interviews with each of your students for every topic, you will want to have regular conversations with students during which you ask them questions and observe them in order to assess the nature of their current understandings. The goal of this assignment is to help you develop ways to listen to students with an ear toward how they are making sense of and approaching mathematical ideas. The type of information gained from this sort of listening should play a central role in your decision making as a teacher. At this time, the goal is not to teach the child, but rather to understand how the child is thinking. For example, if you find that the child does not understand something, do not try to teach them at this moment. The focus of this particular interview is to assess a child’s thinking about key concepts in fractions. We will use this assignment to launch our discussion about fractions in class. Thus, at this point, we do not expect that you enter the interview with a conceptual understanding of fractional ideas. Rather, we will use the child’s ideas to build our own understanding of fractions and of important ways of thinking about fractions that we hope to cultivate in our future students. You will conduct the interview on your own, but will then work with a partner to create a poster showcasing your child’s ideas. For supplementary readings on interviewing children about their mathematical thinking, see myCourses. STEP 1: Arrange Interview. Select a child to interview. The child must be from grades 1-­‐6. The child may be anyone, including a relative, a neighbor, a child who you tutor, etc. There is a letter posted on myCourses that you can modify and have your instructor sign if you need to get permission from a school principal and/or caregiver to conduct and audio-­‐record the interview. If you need help locating a child to work with, we have provided a list of afterschool programs you may contact on myCourses. If you go to one of the afterschool programs, please be respectful and arrive on time. We want to maintain good relations with the programs in order to ensure that they will invite us back in future years. Once you have selected the child, arrange a time and place to conduct the interview. When doing so, request to work with the child for about 30 minutes. The interview may not take this long, but make sure you plan for 30 minutes so that you do not run out of time. The interview may go better if you do not interview the child during an activity that she will not want to miss, like recess. Try to select a quiet, yet public, place to interview the child so that s/he will not be distracted. If you are interviewing the child in a school, you may ask for a quiet room or you may see if the library is available. EDEE 230 Fall 2015 1 STEP 2: Prepare and Undertake the Interview. It is important to prepare for the interview in advance. Use the interview protocol provided for you (posted on myCourses). Note that we have provided different protocols depending on the grade level of the child who you are interviewing. Review the questions ahead of time. In addition, make sure you have the materials specified in the protocol, including a pencil or pen to record your notes on as the child is working. On myCourses, you will find a list of Interviewing Tips and set of readings to help you prepare for the interview. We strongly encourage you to read over the Tips for Flexible Interviewing ahead of time. You must conduct your interview alone (e.g., do not conduct with a partner). This will allow you to practice asking the child questions and recording notes. Additionally, you must audio-­‐record the interview. You will not need to turn in your recording, but it will allow you to transcribe the child’s responses later. You can arrange in advance to have access to an audio-­‐recording device from the Education Media Center (located in the computer lab on the third floor of the Education building). After your interview, be sure to collect the child’s written/drawn work to be included on your final poster. If the children used materials, we suggest taking a picture to have a record of what the child did. Check List for What to Bring to the Interview: o Printed out copy of the Interview Protocol (available on myCourses – to take notes) o Pencil or Pen (to take notes) o Copy of the Representations – see last pages (to provide the child to write on) o Marker or pencil (for student to write with) o (optional) Cut-­‐out rectangles that can stand in for the granola bars o Audio-­‐recorder (ensure that it has enough memory and the batteries are charged) o Camera to take pictures of what the child did STEP 3: Create a Transcript of your Interview After conducting your interview, use your audio recording to create a full transcript of the interview. The full transcript should include the questions you asked and how the child responded word-­‐for-­‐word. You do not need to transcribe the introduction to the interview and any questions you asked to develop rapport with the child. The purpose of the transcript is to help you notice details in what the child said. You will also use pieces of the transcript to create a poster to share with others (see Step 4). Please use pseudonyms for any identifying information (e.g., child’s name, school name, teacher’s name). Submit your full transcript into your instructor on myCourses – due Week 9. To turn in your transcript, after logging in to myCourses, click on “Assignments” at the top right-­‐hand corner of the page. Click on “Flexible Interview Transcript” assignment. Click “Add a File” and upload your transcript. Make sure to press “submit.” EDEE 230 Fall 2015 2 STEP 4: Create a Poster Showcasing Your Children’s Ideas You will create one poster that is approximately the size of half a Bristol Board (about 11 inches x 14 inches). We will look at the completed posters during class as part of our introduction to important ideas in fractions. All text on the poster needs to be typed (at least 18 point font). Please label the sections (e.g., Setting, Transcript, Description of Child’s Response) of your poster so that it is easy to read. Your posters are due in class during Week 9. Your poster needs to include the following sections: Please use pseudonyms for any identifying information (e.g., child’s name, school name, teacher’s name). Additionally, please ensure that images are only of the student’s work and not of the student. • Setting for each interview: Briefly describe the setting of the mathematics interview, using bullet point format (to make it easy for others to quickly read). Include the following: o Who is the child? How do you know him/her? o How old is the child? What grade level is s/he in? o How long did the interview take? o In what language did the interview take place? o Where did the interview take place? (e.g., after-­‐school program). o How did the child seem to feel about it? • Image of the Child’s Work: Include on your poster an image of the child’s work (such as a photo of what the child was doing and/or the actual written work). Do not alter the child’s work in any way. Be sure that the images are large enough so that others can easily see. This should be the focal part of the poster. • Description of the Child’s Response: Describe how the child answered the questions. In your description, include evidence from what the child said and what he or she drew or wrote. For your evidence, select quotes from your transcript to help others understand how the child responded. It is important to include quotes that show what the student understands and what is fragile about his or her understanding. To make it easier for others to follow, use bullet points and organize your description in relation to the questions asked. STEP 5: Comparing Student Work (to be completed in class with a group) During class, you will have the opportunity to work with others who interviewed children of the same age. Within those groups, you will compare your posters and create a poster to turn in. You will be given several prompts to respond to. The prompts will ask you to compare and contrast the children’s work and what they understand about core ideas in fractions. The comparison of student work is temporarily set to occur in class during Week 10 or Week 11. Please note that this date may change depending on the needs of the class. You do not need to find a group in advance. The groups will be determined by your instructor based on the grade levels of the children you interviewed. EDEE 230 Fall 2015 3 ...
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