How a Bill Becomes a Law.docx - How a Bill Becomes a Law Hillary Eisenberg Grand Canyon University Nrs 440v SITUATION IS THIS SOMETHING THAN CAN BE

How a Bill Becomes a Law.docx - How a Bill Becomes a Law...

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How a Bill Becomes a Law Hillary Eisenberg Grand Canyon University Nrs 440v October 27, 2017
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SITUATION: IS THIS SOMETHING THAN CAN BE LEGISLATED? Identify the problem/concern: Nursing shortage As our country’s population continues to age, the need for quality health care continues to rise. Although there are many people choosing to enter the profession, the need for nurses rises every year. Between 2000 and 2020, the United States population is expected to grow by 18 percent (31 million), but the over-65 population, with more health care needs, is expected to grow by 54 percent (19 million)” (Carayon & Gurses, 2008). Being nurses, we want to be able to give our patients the great care that they deserve, with the best outcomes. This becomes hard however, when hospitals are short nurses. Showing up for work and being pushed to the limit for how many patients you can take, with how high their acuity may be, causes many nurses to head straight for burn out. When we are pushed to the limit, the care begins to suffer as the resources begin to dwindle. Why are we still feeling such a strain from the nursing shortage, when so many people are in school to become nurses? State your proposal/idea When the nursing shortages become too much, hospitals and other facilities experience high turn over rates, as nurses can only be pushed so far. With this trend expected to continue into the unforeseeable future, many hospitals are trying to find ways to address the needs of their nurses. When looking for jobs, there are offers such as sign on bonuses, relocation pay, education reimbursement, etc. However, these hospitals are simply just attracting the nurses to leave their present job and go there. This does not help to increase the number of RNs nationwide, and leaves other facilities even more short on staff. Training staff to perform multiple tasks within their scope of practice may help to ease some of the strain from staffing shortage. My proposal is that there be a cap placed
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nationwide, on how many patients each nurse can take. This can be altered to fit specific units, where the acuity may be higher, but there should be a cap that suits each unit for nurse to patient ratio.
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