Nonverbal Communications.docx - Nonverbal Communicatons...

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Nonverbal Communications Introduction Culture is like an iceberg. Some of it is evident but much is hidden. This metaphor can be used in regards to communications. The part of the iceberg that is seen is the spoken word or verbal communications. The part that is hidden is nonverbal communication. Although people may not be consciously aware of it, everyone receives thousands of nonverbal communications every day. This lesson will look at nine forms of nonverbal communications. Learning Materials People receive a myriad of nonverbal communications as part of their daily lives. The red stop light and the markings on a police car are both examples. There are nine general categories of nonverbal communications. They are the following: Facial expressions Gestures Paralinguistics Body language Proxemics Haptics Eye gaze Appearance Artifacts View the following infographic for more information on the types of nonverbal communication.
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Facial Expression Facial expression can be used to communicate a lot of information. One can tell from a person’s expression if they are happy, sad, annoyed, or quizzical. Often, expressions can be subconscious or unintentional. People do not always know what their faces are saying as they are speaking. This can lead to misunderstandings. Some societies frown on overt displays of emotion, and in these cultures, expressions can be more neutral. Other societies are more open about emotions. Here, expressions can be more varied and dynamic.
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