The Style of Intercultural Language.docx

The Style of Intercultural Language.docx - The Style of...

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The Style of Intercultural Language Introduction This node will explore the cultural differences in the styles of intercultural language. As a result of globalization, people now live in a world where others no longer share the same culture or speak the same language. The diversity among cultures has heightened people’s awareness of the difficulty in communicating with one another and the misunderstanding that can happen during verbal communication. The node will continue with an investigation of four verbal communication styles across cultures, focusing on direct versus indirect, elaborate versus understated, personal versus contextual, and instrumental versus affective. It will conclude with the linear and nonlinear thought processes used during intercultural communication. World What is communication style? People all over the world have different preferences to the way in which they communicate. By understanding one’s own style of communication, as well as the communication style of others, one can know how to communicate successfully during intercultural interactions. Communication style is often referred to as meta- communication, a secondary form of communication that includes the indirect cues used for interpretation during the communication. The differences in culture and verbal communication styles are responsible for most of the difficulties that arise during intercultural communication. Most of the obstacles originate from the differences in speaking styles that have been influenced by cultural differences. Intercultural communication authorities like Gudykunst and Ting-Toomey have identified four verbal communication styles that occur across cultures. Direct Versus Indirect Style Anthropologist Edward T. Hall’s theory on high- and low-context culture helps people understand the powerful effect culture has on communication (Chaney & Martin, 2010). The direct and indirect styles are patterns of language that reveal a speaker’s intentions through either explicit verbal cues or implicit, nonverbal cues. Low-context cultures have a tendency to
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use a more explicit and direct style of communication. The direct style consists of verbal communication that shows the sender’s true intentions, what he or she wants, and his or her needs. Unlike low-context cultures, cultures use a more implicit and indirect style of communication. The indirect style consists of high-context verbal communication that will hide
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