The Apology - Questions.docx - Aitana Ruilova September...

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Aitana Ruilova September 15 th , 2015 Philosophy 1010C – Philosophy of the Human Person Dr. Marie I. George Homework #1: The Apology 1a) Socrates states that his accusers hide the truth about their accusations through the embellishment of their speech in order to confuse the court, while Socrates himself, even though he speaks simply, tells them nothing but the truth, according to the following quote by Plato (2015): But you shall hear from me the whole truth; not eloquence, gentlemen, like their own, decked out in fine words and phrases, not covered with ornaments; not at all – you shall hear things spoken anyhow in the words that first come. (p. 503) As for the way in which Socrates speaks, he apologizes to the court for his lack of better words to express himself because he uses the language and manner which he had been brought up to (Plato, 2015, p. 503), which can be implied to be colloquial and inelegant. 1b) Socrates does not need to embellish his words in order to defend himself because he is telling the truth; embellishing speech could cause the court to find itself confused about what really happened and what the truth is, making it more difficult for them to make a just verdict, which is all that Socrates wants. On the other hand, Socrates’ accusers know that what they have said is false, so by embellishing their words and accusations they manage to confuse the court on the accounts of what really happened, clouding their judgment and preventing them from making a just verdict resulting in Socrates’ being found guilty and sentenced to death, which is exactly what Meletos, Anytos and Lycon want. 1c) The Socratic method is characterized by the discussion of topics and putting both parties of the discussion in the spotlight in order to discuss their points of view, and the trial described by Plato (2015) in The Apology is a perfect example. Socrates is asked to defend his innocence by discussing the validity of his accusers’ claims; by asking Meletos to defend his accusations against him, Socrates turns these allegations against the accuser himself through an analysis of the claims and finding them to be inconsistent and nonsensical. For example, according to Plato (2015), Meletos claims that Socrates is an atheist, and Socrates asks him “Is there anyone who believes in spiritual things, but not in spirits?” (p. 514), to which Meletos answers, “No, there is not” (p. 514), and later on Socrates states: But if I believe in spiritual things, surely it is absolutely necessary that I believe in spirits. Is not that right? It is then, for I put you down as agreeing since you do not answer. And spirits, do we not believe them to be either gods or sons of gods? (Plato, 2015, p. 514) Through this statement, Socrates is able to invalidate Meletos’ claim that he is an atheist, proving his allegation to be false, and winning the discussion.
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