Chem_Lab_7.pdf - CH 204 Introduction to Chemical Practice...

  • University of Texas
  • CHEM 204
  • Lab Report
  • gloriadianebenitez
  • 12
  • 100% (2) 2 out of 2 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 1 out of 12 pages.

Unformatted text preview: CH​ ​204​ ​-​ ​Introduction​ ​to​ ​Chemical​ ​Practice Experiment​ ​7​ ​-​ ​Strong​ ​Acid-Strong​ ​Base​ ​Titration Gloria​ ​Benitez* Giahuy​ ​Nguyen TA:​ ​Yunchin​ ​Lin November​ ​6,​ ​2017 INTRODUCTION Acid-Base​ ​reactions​ ​are​ ​also​ ​known​ ​as​ ​neutralization​ ​reactions.​ ​They​ ​are​ ​essentially created​ ​when​ ​a​ ​acidic​ ​solution​ ​combines​ ​with​ ​a​ ​basic​ ​solution​ ​to​ ​produce​ ​a​ ​salt​ ​and​ ​water.​ ​When discussing​ ​acid-base​ ​reactions​ ​pH​ ​readings​ ​are​ ​used​ ​to​ ​express​ ​such​ ​acidic​ ​and​ ​basic​ ​solutions.​ ​A pH​ ​scale​ ​is​ ​the​ ​scale​ ​used​ ​to​ ​describe​ ​the​ ​acidity​ ​or​ ​alkalinity​ ​(basicity)​ ​of​ ​a​ ​water-based​ ​solution. Water​ ​can​ ​dissociate​ ​into​ ​two​ ​ions,​ ​H+​​ ​ ​and​ ​OH​−​​ ​(hydroxide),​ ​and​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​of​ ​a​ ​solution​ ​refers​ ​to the​ ​balance​ ​of​ ​those​ ​two​ ​species.​1​​ ​Acidic​ ​solutions​ ​are​ ​those​ ​with​ ​a​ ​detected​ ​pH​ ​value​ ​below​ ​7 while​ ​a​ ​basic​ ​solution​ ​are​ ​those​ ​with​ ​a​ ​detected​ ​pH​ ​above​ ​7;​ ​furthermore,​ ​a​ ​pH​ ​reading​ ​of​ ​exactly 7​ ​indicated​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​is​ ​neutral.​ ​Titrations​ ​are​ ​used​ ​during​ ​this​ ​experiment.​ ​Essentially​ ​a titration​ ​is​ ​the​ ​addition​ ​of​ ​a​ ​measured​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​a​ ​solution​ ​of​ ​known​ ​concentration​ ​to​ ​a​ ​sample of​ ​another​ ​solution​ ​for​ ​the​ ​purpose​ ​of​ ​determining​ ​the​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​target​ ​solution​ ​on​ ​the basis​ ​of​ ​the​ ​appearance​ ​of​ ​a​ ​color​ ​or​ ​agglutination,​ ​etc.​2​​ ​During​ ​a​ ​titration​ ​a​ ​equivalence​ ​point can​ ​be​ ​seen​ ​on​ ​a​ ​titration​ ​curve​ ​when​ ​excess​ ​H+​​ ​ ​ions​ ​are​ ​equally​ ​neutralized​ ​by​ ​OH​-​​ ​ions; moreover,​ ​this​ ​usually​ ​occurs​ ​at​ ​a​ ​pH​ ​of​ ​7.​ ​A​ ​endpoint​ ​can​ ​be​ ​detected​ ​during​ ​a​ ​titration​ ​when​ ​the indicator​ ​changes​ ​colors.​ ​During​ ​this​ ​experiment,​ ​ ​multiple​ ​titrations​ ​were​ ​done​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​an unknown​ ​solution​ ​of​ ​HCl​ ​concentration​ ​given​ ​a​ ​strong​ ​known​ ​base​ ​with​ ​known​ ​concentrations. The​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​made​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​a​ ​standard​ ​KHP.​ ​The​ ​NaOH​ ​made​ ​was​ ​further used​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​HCl​ ​sample;​ ​moreover,​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​and​ ​volume​ ​was observed​ ​and​ ​recorded​ ​throughout​ ​making​ ​the​ ​titrations. EXPERIMENTAL To​ ​begin​ ​the​ ​experiment,​ ​the​ ​preparation​ ​and​ ​standardization​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​completed.​ ​A theoretical​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​0.5​ ​M​ ​NaOH​ ​to​ ​neutralize​ ​2​ ​grams​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​was​ ​calculated;​ ​furthermore, the​ ​theoretical​ ​value​ ​was​ ​19.6​ ​mL.​ ​This​ ​number​ ​was​ ​achieved​ ​by​ ​converting​ ​2​ ​grams​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​to moles​ ​of​ ​KHP.​ ​Then​ ​the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​was​ ​divided​ ​by​ ​0.5​ ​M​ ​NaOH​ ​to​ ​get​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​value in​ ​liters​ ​which​ ​was​ ​then​ ​converted​ ​into​ ​mL​ ​by​ ​multiplying​ ​the​ ​amount​ ​by​ ​1000.​ ​After​ ​calculating the​ ​theoretical​ ​value,​ ​the​ ​preparation​ ​of​ ​200​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​an​ ​aqueous​ ​0.5​ ​M​ ​NaOH​ ​solution​ ​was​ ​made. 200​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​was​ ​obtained​ ​and​ ​50​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​that​ ​200​ ​mL​ ​was​ ​poured​ ​into​ ​a​ ​400​ ​mL beaker.​ ​4.0​ ​grams​ ​of​ ​solid​ ​NaOH​ ​were​ ​then​ ​added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​400​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​containing​ ​50​ ​mL​ ​of deionized​ ​water.​ ​The​ ​remaining​ ​150​ ​mL​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​was​ ​then​ ​added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​400​ ​mL​ ​beaker G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​1​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 and​ ​a​ ​stir​ ​bar​ ​was​ ​inserted​ ​to​ ​gently​ ​stir​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​in​ ​the​ ​400​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​and​ ​the​ ​stir​ ​bar​ ​was left​ ​there​ ​until​ ​the​ ​solid​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​completely​ ​dissolved.​ ​Next​ ​the​ ​preparation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​LabQuest device​ ​and​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​achieved​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​data​ ​collection.​ ​The​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​was​ ​plugged into​ ​a​ ​power​ ​outlet,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​was​ ​properly​ ​turned​ ​on.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​then connected​ ​into​ ​channel​ ​1​ ​which​ ​was​ ​then​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​a​ ​pH​ ​reading​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device screen.​ ​“Sensors”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​“Data​ ​Collection”.​ ​In​ ​the mode​ ​box​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device,​ ​“Events​ ​and​ ​Entry”​ ​was​ ​selected.​ ​In​ ​the​ ​name​ ​box​ ​“Volume” was​ ​selected​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​selection​ ​of​ ​“mL”​ ​in​ ​the​ ​corresponding​ ​units​ ​box;​ ​furthermore, “OK”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​to​ ​save​ ​the​ ​desired​ ​settings.​ ​Before​ ​the​ ​titration​ ​could​ ​begin,​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​had to​ ​be​ ​“conditioned”.​ ​To​ ​achieve​ ​this​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​clamp​ ​was​ ​used​ ​to​ ​secure​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​to​ ​the​ ​ring stand,​ ​then​ ​the​ ​stopcock​ ​was​ ​closed​ ​and​ ​10​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​was​ ​added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​using a​ ​plastic​ ​funnel.​ ​The​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​removed​ ​from​ ​the​ ​ring​ ​stand​ ​while​ ​a​ ​gloved​ ​finger​ ​was​ ​placed at​ ​the​ ​opening​ ​of​ ​the​ ​burette.​ ​The​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​then​ ​inverted​ ​multiple​ ​times​ ​to​ ​rinse​ ​the​ ​inside surfaces​ ​of​ ​the​ ​burette.​ ​The​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​re-clamped​ ​to​ ​the​ ​ring​ ​stand,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​waste​ ​beaker​ ​was placed​ ​beneath​ ​the​ ​burette;​ ​moreover,​ ​the​ ​stopcock​ ​was​ ​reopened,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​water​ ​was​ ​drained​ ​into the​ ​waste​ ​beaker.​ ​The​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​“conditioned”​ ​again​ ​using​ ​the​ ​same​ ​steps​ ​previously mentioned.​ ​After​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​“conditioned”​ ​a​ ​second​ ​time​ ​with​ ​deionized​ ​water,​ ​the​ ​solution previously​ ​made​ ​in​ ​the​ ​400​ ​mL​ ​beaker,​ ​containing​ ​the​ ​NaOH​ ​and​ ​deionized​ ​water,​ ​was​ ​used​ ​to “condition”​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​twice​ ​more;moreover,​ ​5-10​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​in​ ​the​ ​400​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​was used​ ​using​ ​the​ ​same​ ​steps​ ​when​ ​using​ ​deionized​ ​water.​ ​Next​ ​the​ ​KHP​ ​aqueous​ ​solution​ ​was prepared.​ ​2.0​ ​grams​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​was​ ​placed​ ​into​ ​a​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker.​ ​80​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​and​ ​a stir​ ​bar​ ​was​ ​added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker;​ ​furthermore,​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​was​ ​stirred​ ​until​ ​the​ ​KHP completely​ ​dissolved.​ ​3​ ​drops​ ​of​ ​phenolphthalein​ ​was​ ​added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​250 mL​ ​beaker​ ​was​ ​placed​ ​beneath​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​appropriately​ ​with​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​being​ ​stirred continuously​ ​throughout​ ​the​ ​titration​ ​with​ ​the​ ​stir​ ​bar.​ ​Next​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​prepared​ ​for measurements.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​removed​ ​from​ ​the​ ​bottle​ ​by​ ​unscrewing​ ​the​ ​cap​ ​from​ ​the​ ​bottle and​ ​removing​ ​the​ ​probe​ ​from​ ​the​ ​cap;​ ​moreover,​ ​the​ ​tip​ ​of​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​rinsed​ ​with deionized​ ​water​ ​above​ ​the​ ​waste​ ​beaker.​ ​A​ ​utility​ ​clamp​ ​was​ ​used​ ​the​ ​secure​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​to​ ​the ring​ ​stand,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​tip​ ​of​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​submerged​ ​into​ ​the​ ​KHP​ ​solution,​ ​250mL​ ​beaker previously​ ​prepared.​ ​“Collect”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​data​ ​collection. Before​ ​the​ ​addition​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​solution,​ ​“Keep”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​and​ ​“0”​ ​was​ ​entered​ ​into​ ​the LabQuest​ ​device​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​“OK”​ ​to​ ​save​ ​the​ ​initial​ ​volume​ ​settings.​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was added​ ​to​ ​the​ ​KHP​ ​solution.​ ​The​ ​determination​ ​of​ ​the​ ​exact​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​added​ ​was determined,​ ​and​ ​once​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​reading​ ​stabilized,​ ​“Keep”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​and​ ​the​ ​volumes determined​ ​was​ ​typed​ ​into​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device;furthermore,​ ​“OK”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​to​ ​save​ ​the​ ​data pair.​ ​To​ ​proceed​ ​with​ ​the​ ​titration,​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​were​ ​added​ ​and​ ​recorded​ ​into​ ​the​ ​LabQuest device​ ​as​ ​previously​ ​mentioned​ ​until​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​in​ ​the​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​3​ ​mL​ ​below​ ​the​ ​theoretical volume​ ​mentioned​ ​previously​ ​as​ ​well.​ ​Once​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​3​ ​mL​ ​below​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​point,​ ​2 portions​ ​of​ ​0.5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​added​ ​and​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​2​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 after​ ​each​ ​insertion.​ ​The​ ​final​ ​dropwise​ ​NaOH​ ​addition​ ​was​ ​added​ ​until​ ​the​ ​KHP​ ​solution​ ​turned pink​ ​briefly​ ​then​ ​turned​ ​back​ ​colorless,​ ​however,​ ​once​ ​the​ ​pink​ ​color​ ​remained​ ​in​ ​the​ ​KHP solution,​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​was​ ​detected.​ ​Once​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​was​ ​detected,​ ​four​ ​1​ ​mL​ ​portions followed​ ​by​ ​two​ ​2​ ​mL​ ​portions​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​were​ ​inserted,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the LabQuest​ ​device​ ​after​ ​each​ ​insertion.​ ​“Stop”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device,​ ​and​ ​the reaction​ ​mixture​ ​was​ ​disposed​ ​of​ ​appropriately.​ ​The​ ​tip​ ​of​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​rinsed​ ​above​ ​the waste​ ​beaker​ ​with​ ​deionized​ ​water,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​submerged​ ​in​ ​a​ ​small​ ​beaker​ ​of deionized​ ​water​ ​to​ ​avoid​ ​drying​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​out.​ ​A​ ​second​ ​titration​ ​was​ ​performed​ ​using​ ​the same​ ​steps​ ​previously​ ​mentioned​ ​beginning​ ​after​ ​conditioning​ ​the​ ​burette. Next​ ​the​ ​titration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​unknown​ ​HCl​ ​was​ ​performed.​ ​15​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​an​ ​“unknown”​ ​HCl sample​ ​was​ ​given.​ ​The​ ​burette​ ​was​ ​refilled​ ​with​ ​NaOH​ ​with​ ​a​ ​plastic​ ​funnel,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​new​ ​initial volume​ ​was​ ​recorded.​ ​A​ ​stir​ ​bar​ ​and​ ​75​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​was​ ​added​ ​into​ ​a​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker; moreover,​ ​with​ ​the​ ​use​ ​of​ ​a​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​volumetric​ ​pipette,​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​the​ ​unknown​ ​HCl​ ​solution​ ​was added​ ​into​ ​the​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​3​ ​drops​ ​of​ ​phenolphthalein.​ ​The​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​was placed​ ​on​ ​a​ ​stir​ ​plate.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​appropriately​ ​submerged​ ​into​ ​the​ ​HCl​ ​solution.​ ​A​ ​“fast run”​ ​titration​ ​was​ ​performed​ ​on​ ​the​ ​unknown​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​approximate​ ​volume​ ​that​ ​the endpoint​ ​would​ ​be​ ​detected​ ​at.​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​added​ ​quickly​ ​until​ ​the​ ​solution​ ​remained​ ​pink; furthermore,​ ​a​ ​corresponding ​volume​ ​was​ ​calculated​ ​to​ ​give​ ​an​ ​approximation​ ​of​ ​when​ ​the endpoint​ ​would​ ​be​ ​reached​ ​in​ ​the​ ​following​ ​titrations.​ ​The​ ​reaction​ ​mixture​ ​was​ ​disposed​ ​of​ ​in​ ​a waste​ ​container,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​tip​ ​of​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​rinsed​ ​with​ ​deionized​ ​water.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was again​ ​submerged​ ​into​ ​a​ ​small​ ​beaker​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​to​ ​avoid​ ​drying​ ​out​ ​the​ ​sensor.​ ​The burette​ ​was​ ​refilled​ ​with​ ​NaOH​ ​with​ ​a​ ​plastic​ ​funnel,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​new​ ​initial​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded.​ ​A stir​ ​bar​ ​and​ ​75​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​deionized​ ​water​ ​was​ ​added​ ​into​ ​a​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker;​ ​moreover,​ ​with​ ​the​ ​use of​ ​a​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​volumetric​ ​pipette,​ ​5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​the​ ​unknown​ ​HCl​ ​solution​ ​was​ ​added​ ​into​ ​the​ ​250​ ​mL beaker​ ​followed​ ​by​ ​3​ ​drops​ ​of​ ​phenolphthalein.​ ​The​ ​250​ ​mL​ ​beaker​ ​was​ ​placed​ ​on​ ​a​ ​stir​ ​plate. The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​appropriately​ ​submerged​ ​into​ ​the​ ​HCl​ ​solution.​ ​The​ ​“File​ ​cabinet”​ ​icon​ ​was selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​to​ ​initiate​ ​a​ ​new​ ​run.​ ​“Collect”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest device​ ​to​ ​begin​ ​the​ ​first​ ​titration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​unknown​ ​HCl​ ​solution.​ ​“Keep”​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​and​ ​“0”​ ​was inserted​ ​into​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​before​ ​any​ ​addition​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​made.​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​added​ ​in​ ​2 mL​ ​increments​ ​until​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​observed​ ​to​ ​be​ ​3​ ​mL​ ​below​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​value;​ ​moreover, the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​after​ ​each​ ​insertion.​ ​Once​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​3​ ​mL below​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​value,​ ​two​ ​0.5​ ​mL​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​added​ ​and​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the LabQuest​ ​device​ ​after​ ​each​ ​insertion.​ ​Next​ ​in​ ​dropwise​ ​insertions,​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​added​ ​until​ ​the HCl​ ​solution​ ​turned​ ​pink​ ​and​ ​remained​ ​pink;​ ​furthermore,​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​was​ ​detected​ ​once​ ​the HCl​ ​solution​ ​remained​ ​pink.​ ​The​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​after​ ​each insertion.​ ​Once​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​was​ ​detected,​ ​four​ ​1​ ​mL​ ​portions​ ​and​ ​two​ ​2​ ​mL​ ​portions​ ​of​ ​NaOH were​ ​added​ ​and​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​recorded​ ​in​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device​ ​after​ ​each​ ​insertion.​ ​“Stop”​ ​was selected​ ​on​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device.​ ​A​ ​second​ ​titration​ ​was​ ​performed​ ​using​ ​the​ ​same​ ​steps previously​ ​mentioned​ ​beginning​ ​after​ ​the​ ​fast​ ​run.​ ​Once​ ​the​ ​titrations​ ​were​ ​completed,​ ​the​ ​data G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​3​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 was​ ​saved​ ​on​ ​the​ ​USB​ ​drive.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​unplugged​ ​from​ ​the​ ​LabQuest​ ​device,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​was rinsed​ ​with​ ​deionized​ ​water.​ ​The​ ​pH​ ​probe​ ​was​ ​inserted​ ​back​ ​into​ ​the​ ​designated​ ​storage​ ​cap appropriately.​ ​The​ ​LabQuest​ ​was​ ​turned​ ​off​ ​and​ ​the​ ​materials​ ​used​ ​in​ ​the​ ​experiment​ ​were returned​ ​appropriately. RESULTS​ ​&​ ​DISCUSSION The​ ​purpose​ ​of​ ​this​ ​experiment​ ​was​ ​to​ ​perform​ ​multiple​ ​titrations​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​an unknown​ ​solution​ ​of​ ​HCl​ ​concentration​ ​given​ ​a​ ​strong​ ​known​ ​base​ ​with​ ​known​ ​concentrations. The​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​made​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​a​ ​standard​ ​KHP.​ ​The​ ​NaOH​ ​made​ ​was​ ​further used​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​the​ ​HCl​ ​sample;​ ​moreover,​ ​the​ ​pH​ ​and​ ​volume​ ​was observed​ ​and​ ​recorded​ ​throughout​ ​making​ ​the​ ​titrations.​ ​If​ ​the​ ​experiment​ ​were​ ​repeated​ ​a recommendation​ ​would​ ​be​ ​to​ ​add​ ​a​ ​step​ ​that​ ​says​ ​to​ ​literally​ ​add​ ​drops​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​once​ ​you​ ​see the​ ​solution​ ​turning​ ​pink​ ​and​ ​back​ ​colorless.​ ​With​ ​this​ ​included,​ ​exaggerated​ ​step,​ ​a​ ​more​ ​precise endpoint​ ​will​ ​be​ ​observed. The​ ​volumes​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​observed​ ​at​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​and​ ​the​ ​equivalence​ ​were​ ​similar​ ​but​ ​not exactly​ ​the​ ​same.​ ​For​ ​example,​ ​in​ ​the​ ​first​ ​titration​ ​the​ ​NaOH​ ​volume​ ​observed​ ​at​ ​the​ ​endpoint was​ ​19.10​ ​mL​ ​while​ ​the​ ​NaOH​ ​volume​ ​observed​ ​at​ ​the​ ​equivalence​ ​point​ ​was​ ​18.56​ ​mL.​ ​The more​ ​accurate​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​the​ ​NaOH​ ​volume​ ​detected​ ​at​ ​the​ ​endpoint,​ ​19.10​ ​mL.​ ​The​ ​endpoint was​ ​more​ ​accurate​ ​because​ ​it​ ​was​ ​closer​ ​to​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​volume​ ​calculated​ ​at​ ​the​ ​beginning​ ​of the​ ​experiment,​ ​19.6​ ​mL.​ ​The​ ​theoretical​ ​volume​ ​was​ ​calculated​ ​by​ ​converting​ ​2.0​ ​grams​ ​of KHP​ ​to​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP,​ ​which​ ​was​ ​0.00979336​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP.​ ​Next​ ​liters​ ​was​ ​determined​ ​by dividing​ ​0.00979336​ ​(moles​ ​of​ ​KHP)​ ​by​ ​0.5​ ​M​ ​of​ ​NaOH;​ ​moreover,​ ​this​ ​got​ ​a​ ​value​ ​of​ ​0.0196 liters​ ​which​ ​is​ ​equivalent​ ​to​ ​19.6​ ​mL.​ ​The​ ​endpoint​ ​volume​ ​observed​ ​compared​ ​to​ ​the​ ​theoretical volume​ ​has​ ​a​ ​percent​ ​error​ ​of​ ​2.61%​ ​while​ ​the​ ​equivalence​ ​point​ ​volume​ ​observed​ ​compared​ ​to the​ ​theoretical​ ​volume​ ​has​ ​a​ ​percent​ ​error​ ​of​ ​5.58%.​ ​The​ ​percent​ ​error​ ​was​ ​calculated​ ​by​ ​taking the​ ​observed​ ​volume​ ​and​ ​subtracting​ ​the​ ​theoretical​ ​volume;​ ​moreover,​ ​this​ ​number​ ​is​ ​divided​ ​by the​ ​observed​ ​volume​ ​and​ ​multiplied​ ​by​ ​100.​ ​Because​ ​the​ ​endpoint​ ​volume​ ​had​ ​a​ ​smaller​ ​percent error​ ​(2.61%)​ ​than​ ​the​ ​equivalence​ ​point​ ​volume​ ​error​ ​(5.58%),​ ​this​ ​is​ ​further​ ​evidence​ ​that endpoint​ ​volume​ ​is​ ​more​ ​accurate. G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​4​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​5​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​6​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​7​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 G.Benitez​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​8​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Fall​ ​2017 In​ ​order​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​actual​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​solution,​ ​the​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​grams​ ​of KHP​ ​used​ ​during​ ​trial​ ​one​ ​to​ ​neutralize​ ​(2.028​ ​g)​ ​was​ ​converted​ ​into​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​by​ ​dividing 2.028​ ​grams​ ​by​ ​the​ ​molecular​ ​weight​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​(204.22​ ​g/mol)​ ​which​ ​led​ ​to​ ​0.0099​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP. Next​ ​a​ ​1:1​ ​ratio​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​to​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​observed​ ​in​ ​the​ ​balanced​ ​formula​ ​unit​ ​equation, HKC​8​H​4​O​4(aq)​+NaOH​(aq)​→NaKC​8​H​4​O​4(aq)​+H​2​O​(l)​;furthermore,​ ​with​ ​a​ ​1:1​ ​ratio​ ​it​ ​is​ ​assumed​ ​that the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​is​ ​equivalent​ ​to​ ​the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH,​ ​so​ ​the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​is​ ​also​ ​0.0099 moles.​ ​Next​ ​the​ ​equation​ ​M=​ ​moles/​ ​liters​ ​was​ ​used​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​actual​ ​concentration.​ ​The moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​previously​ ​determined​ ​was​ ​divided​ ​by​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​detected​ ​at​ ​the​ ​equivalence point​ ​(18.564​ ​mL​ ​=​ ​0.018564​ ​L)​ ​which​ ​gave​ ​a​ ​calculated​ ​concentration​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​solution​ ​of 0.5333​ ​M.​ ​The​ ​same​ ​process​ ​was​ ​done​ ​to​ ​trial​ ​two.​ ​The​ ​amount​ ​of​ ​grams​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​used​ ​during trial​ ​two​ ​to​ ​neutralize​ ​(2.147​ ​g)​ ​was​ ​converted​ ​into​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​by​ ​dividing​ ​2.147​ ​grams​ ​by the​ ​molecular​ ​weight​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​(204.22​ ​g/mol)​ ​which​ ​led​ ​to​ ​0.0105​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP.​ ​Next​ ​a​ ​1:1​ ​ratio of​ ​KHP​ ​to​ ​NaOH​ ​was​ ​observed​ ​in​ ​the​ ​balanced​ ​formula​ ​unit​ ​equation, HKC​8​H​4​O​4(aq)​+NaOH​(aq)​→NaKC​8​H​4​O​4(aq)​+H​2​O​(l)​;furthermore,​ ​with​ ​a​ ​1:1​ ​ratio​ ​it​ ​is​ ​assumed​ ​that the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​KHP​ ​is​ ​equivalent​ ​to​ ​the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH,​ ​so​ ​the​ ​moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​is​ ​also​ ​0.0105 moles.​ ​Next​ ​the​ ​equation​ ​M=​ ​moles/​ ​liters​ ​was​ ​used​ ​to​ ​determine​ ​the​ ​actual​ ​concentration.​ ​The moles​ ​of​ ​NaOH​ ​previously​ ​determined​ ​was​ ​divided​ ​by​ ​the​ ​volume​ ​detected​...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture